Bowlby Centre Online Conference 2021

Saturday 24 April 2021

Attachment, the body and gender

Can we assume there is a link between our early attachment history and how we come to develop our sense of gender?

In what way can the treatment of our bodies as babies impact on our sense of gender?

To what extent do we form our gender identity from our caregivers’ sense of their own gender?

How do our attachments to primary caregivers impact on our ability to safely explore our gender identities?

What is the impact on us when we can’t talk about our gendered sense of self?

This conference will bring together clinicians from diverse backgrounds to explore the ways in which our early attachments may contribute to how we develop our sense of a gendered self and how we come to experience our bodies sexually. Our speakers will be bringing multiple perspectives to this conference – and in particular, perspectives from attachment theory, feminism and transgender theory. The aim of this conference is to explore and develop our understanding of the many ways in which we come to experience our bodies and how we choose to identify ourselves.

Programme

09.00-09.30     Registration/Getting on-line
09.30-09.45     Introduction to the conference – Tori Settle CEO of The Bowlby Centre
09.45-11.00     Meg-John Barker in conversation with Jane Czyzselska
11.00-11.30     Break
11.30-12.45     Igi Moon in conversation with Jane Czyzselska
12.45-13.45     Lunch
13.45-15.00     Susie Orbach in conversation with Anthea Benjamin
15.00-15.30     Break
15.30-16.45     Daniel Edmund in conversation with Anthea Benjamin
16.45-17.15     Plenary
17.15               Closing remarks and thanks – Tori Settle CEO of The Bowlby Centre

Video of the conference

Speakers

Meg-John Barker (they/them)

Meg-John Barker is the author of a number of popular books on sex, gender, and relationships, including graphic guides to Queer, Gender, and Sexuality (with Jules Scheele), How To Understand Your Gender, Hell Yeah Self Care, and Life Isn’t Binary (with Alex Iantaffi), Enjoy Sex (How, When, and IF You Want To) (with Justin Hancock), Rewriting the Rules and The Psychology of Sex

They also work as a one-to-one writing mentor, as a creative consultant on various projects, and speak and train on gender, sexual and relationship diversity. They are half of the Meg-John and Justin podcast (megjohnandjustin.com) and blog and publish zines and comics on rewriting-the-rules.com. They regularly speak on their areas of expertise in the media, including Radio 4, Cosmo, and being featured in the Independent on Sunday Rainbow List.

They were an academic psychologist and UKCP accredited therapist for many years before focusing on writing full time. They are an internationally recognised expert on gender, sexual, and relationship diversity (GSRD) and therapy, with numerous academic books and papers on the topics of bisexuality, open non-monogamy, sadomasochism, non-binary gender, and Buddhist mindfulness. They co-founded the journal Psychology & Sexuality and the activist-research organisation BiUK, through which they published The Bisexuality Report. They have advised many organisations, therapeutic bodies, and governmental departments on matters relating to gender, sexual, and relationship diversity (GSRD) including writing the BACP document on the topic. They’ve also been involved in facilitating many public events on sexuality and relationships, including Sense about Sex and Critical Sexology. Twitter: @megjohnbarker, Instagram: @meg_john_barker.Facebook: megjohnbarkerwriter. YouTube: MegJohnBarkerPsych,

Susie Orbach (she/her)

Susie Orbach is a psychotherapist, psychoanalyst, writer and co-founder of The Women’s Therapy Centre in London and The Women’s Therapy Centre in New York. She is the author of many books. Her most recent In Therapy: The Unfolding Story is an expanded edition of In Therapy (an annotated version of the BBC series listened to live by 2 million people)…

Her first book Fat is a Feminist Issue has been continuously in print since 1978. Bodies (which won the APA Psychology of Women’s Book Prize in 2009) was updated in 2019.

She is the recipient of the Inaugural British Psychoanalytic Council’s Lifetime Achievement Award. She is an elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature (FRSL).

Igi Moon (they/them)

Igi Moon is the Chair of the MoU Coalition Against Conversion Therapy.  They are a Senior Lecturer of Counselling Psychology at Roehampton University and they also lecture at Warwick University, Sociology. They have  designed and are now delivering ‘Beyond the Binary: Trans/Forming gender’ which is the first module of its kind in sociology in the UK and they are putting together a textbook for future reference…

They have edited 3 books: ‘Feeling Queer or Queer Feelings? Radical Approaches to Counselling Sex, Sexualities and Genders’; ‘Counselling Ideologies: Queer Challenges to Heteronormativity’ and ‘The Emergence of Trans: Cultures, Politics and Everyday Life’. They are interested in the way therapeutic knowledge and affect is shaped through historical, cultural, political and colonialist tropes. What makes a liveable life?

Daniel Edmund (him/he)

Daniel is a dynamic Speaker, Presenter and Social Entrepreneur. Through all of his endeavours, he is committed to helping to lead this generation to a more inclusive and equitable world for all people. In 2015, Daniel got his start in professional speaking at TEDxBristol where he spoke to an audience of over 2,000 people on the issue of men’s mental health

Since then he has gone on to meet His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales at his summer home at Highgrove, speak at Kensington Palace and join the L’Oreal and Prince’s Trust #AllWorthIt campaign alongside Dame Helen Mirren, amongst other things.

Over the past six years, Daniel has worked with various community groups to further understand the challenges they face and how we can all help progress their lived experiences. From combatting male suicide in the UK, teaching and supporting white working-class young people, campaigning against the sexual harassment of women, fighting for the racial justice of Black and minoritised people, and more, Daniel stands unequivocally firm for the equality and equity of all people.

Daniel is currently the host of the podcast Race & Gender Unfiltered and is working on his debut documentary under the same name. Daniel’s work can be summarised into three main categories: leadership, gender and race. He believes that we are all leaders in our spheres of influence, and that through truth, empathy, integrity and unity we can all play a role in helping to induce positive cultural change in our communities and ultimately the world.

Chairs

Jane Czyzselska

Jane Czyzselska (she/her)

Jane Czyzselska is a relational integrative psychotherapist and counsellor in private practice and a writer. As a practitioner, writer and in life, she endeavours to engage with the harmful impacts of white cis hetero-patriarchy. From 2004-2017 she was the editor of DIVA magazine and was featured in the Independent on Sunday Rainbow List.

She recently helped to promote and wrote about (https://medium.com/stillpointspaces/freuds-famous-case-of-female-homosexuality-a-book-review-on-the-story-of-sidonie-c-328e09111c4b) the new English translation of the biography of Freud’s lesbian patient: The History of Sidonie C. She is currently collaborating with clinicians from a range of modalities and lived experiences on a forthcoming book, Queering the Couch. Her paper, based on her Master’s dissertation: The truth that’s denied: Psychotherapy with LGBTIQ+ clients who identify as intersex, will be published in a forthcoming special issue of the Psychology of Sexualities Review on Intersex and Psychology in the UK. She is a trustee of The Relational School.

Anthea Benjamin

Anthea Benjamin (she/her)

Anthea Benjamin is a UKCP registered Integrative Arts Psychotherapist, Group Analyst and Supervisor. Anthea has worked extensively with children, adolescents, adults, families, couples, and groups for over 15 years in various settings including schools, community projects and within the NHS.

She works as a therapist delivering training and consultancy in a range of professional and educational contexts. Anthea also offers therapeutic services such as self-reflective groups and team supervision both in organizations and within her private practice in south London. Anthea has a special interest in racial trauma, particularly working with racial trauma in the body.   Address for Correspondence info@antheabenjamin.co.uk

‘Through to you’ by Witta Priester

The 23rd John Bowlby Memorial International Conference, London

‘Repetition, Repetition, Repetition: Breaking the Cycle of Attachment Trauma’

3rd & 4th March 2017

When people have experienced attachment trauma, being caught in a never-ending cycle of emotional and relational repetition can dominate their lives. In the words of Selma Fraiberg: “Trauma demands repetition”. Attachment trauma can leave a person with an impaired and constricted life, overwhelming feelings, internal critical voices and a tendency towards an unhealthy dissociation. These features lie at the core of the repetitions we encounter with our clients, often in the form of relational reenactment in the psychotherapy setting. Such reenactments can be difficult to be conscious of for both therapist and the client. Furthermore, such reenactments are not only experienced in the consulting room, but also on a societal level, as seen for example in war and its many impacts.

John Bowlby, with a base in an ever growing body of empirical research, has taught us that it is attachment and secure relationships which are the bedrock of affect regulation and developed reflective functioning. It is in such secure attachment relationships where a client can gradually create and find a new and more coherent narrative, which helps them break away from the painful relational repetitions of the past.

In this conference, we have brought together worldwide specialists who have contributed greatly to the understanding of attachment, trauma, and dissociation. With such a wealth of knowledge and experience, we aim to explore the many pathways that compose traumatic experiences, their repetitive nature and the various ways which can help our clients move on with renewed vitality and hope.

SPEAKERS:

Onno Van der Hart (The Netherlands: co-author of The Haunted Self)

Karl-Heinz Brisch (Germany: author of Treating Attachment Disorders)

Ruth Lanius (Canada: co-author of Healing the Traumatized Self)

Adrienne Harris (USA: co-author of First Do No Harm)

Susie Orbach ( UK: author of Bodies, Fat is a feminist issue)

Guy Hibbert (UK: film director and writer, May 33rd and Eye in the Sky)

Orit Badouk Epstein (UK: co-author of Ritual Abuse and Mind Control)

Daniel Shaw (USA: author of Traumatic Narcissism)

Date: Twenty Second John Bowlby Memorial Conference 2015

Unlocking Pain – Disrupted Attachment and Chronic Physical Pain

Screenshot 2015-11-26 at 16.05.49

Date: 2014 Autumn Conference

ATTACHMENT, MEMORY LOSS and AGEING

 

Autumn Conference 2014

Date: 2014 John Bowlby Memorial Conference

Date: 2013 John Bowlby Memorial Conference

Past Clinical Forums

‘Seeing is Believing’: using video feedback in parent – infant psychotherapy to help shift parents’ and babies’ negative representations of themselves

Saturday, 12 June 2021, 11am to 1pm, Via Video Link
Cost: £30 (Bowlby Centre members and students – free)
Presenter: Joanna Tucker, Consultant Parent-Infant Psychotherapist

Synopsis: My main hypothesis in this paper is that when parents see something for themselves it can surprise their unconscious, destabilise them, open up the possibility of change and speed it up. We need to find ways of helping parent and baby to connect while the baby is as young as possible, before difficulties in relationships become ‘set’ and much more difficult to shift. At OXPIP we believe that, for some families, integrating a strength-based video-feedback intervention into psychoanalytic parent-infant psychotherapy can help change parents’ representations of themselves, and of their babies, more quickly and effectively than either of these ways of working on their own. In this paper I will explore why that might be. I will use video clips to illustrate how the relationship between a depressed mother and her baby changed over the course of their brief therapy.

About the speaker: Joanna became passionate about the value of early intervention whilst a social worker in the field of child abuse. In 1999, a few years after completing her psychoanalytic psychotherapy training, she became involved with OXPIP (The Oxford Parent-Infant Project.) She has had various roles, including Parent-Infant Psychotherapist, Supervisor, Trainer, Infant Observation Seminar leader, Video Interaction Guidance supervisor, and Clinical Director.In October 2019 she largely retired from OXPIP, but continues to enjoy doing some Consultation and Training for them. Joanna has taught on several therapeutic and academic trainings, and has had a number of articles published about clinical work in the perinatal period.

Clinical Forum – Via Video link – ATTACHMENT THEORY AND ARCHIVAL RESEARCH – REFLECTIONS ON AN ONGOING RESEARCH JOURNEY

Saturday, 13th March 2021   11am – 1pm

Speaker: Kate Brown

Synopsis:
This workshop is a discussion of an ongoing doctoral research project entitled ‘A History of the Cotswold Community, psychoanalytic perspectives on love and hate.’ The Cotswold Community (1967-2011) was a therapeutic community for adolescent boys aged 9-16 who had experienced trauma and disrupted attachments. The discussion will cover a brief description of therapeutic communities, including how therapeutic communities for adults and children differ. The Cotswold Community and it’s past as an approved school for boys will be explored. Themes of deprivation and delinquency, Winnicottian understanding of the therapeutic aspects of love and hate and the importance of gender at the Cotswold Community will be discussed. The research methods used in this research is archival research and is informed by attachment theory.

About the speaker
Kate Brown is a Bowlby Centre trained UKCP registered Attachment based psychoanalytic psychotherapist who started her career in therapeutic communities working with adults with a variety of mental health difficulties, and with adolescents individually and in groups. She has worked with young mothers and in mainstream community psychiatric services with patients’ families. She has also provided time-limited therapy with former servicemen who had experienced complex trauma. She has taught at the
Bowlby Centre and has also delivered freelance training. Kate completed an MSc in psychotherapeutic approaches in mental health in 2012. Kate is a former member of the Attachment journal group, former chair of the clinical forum at the Bowlby Centre and PhD candidate at Middlesex University. Kate is also on the executive committee of the International Attachment Network (UK). Kate is in private practice in Bournemouth.

Date: Saturday, 13th March 2021

Time: 11.00am – 1.00pm

Cost: £30  (Bowlby Centre members and students – free)

Download the flyer

CPD: 2 hours (CPD certificate provided)

Download the flyer

Clinical Forum – Via Video link – Nuts and Bolts

Saturday, 12th December 2020   11am – 1pm

Speaker: Tori Settle

Synopsis:
Tori would like to explore in more detail what her approach looks like in the room -using short clinical vignettes and discussion rather than the usual long clinical presentation. She has put together tips for working with avoidance, preoccupation and disorganisation based on her experience over the last 20 years. Her understanding of working with attachment patterns is not about putting people into discreet categories, but of seeing how care seeking and caregiving dynamics can shift from moment to moment in the room. She sees this moment to moment movement between security and insecurityas afluid process –both between the psychotherapist and the clients, and within each of them –as they navigate their levels of confidence and fearfulness in the work and in each other.

About the speaker
Tori Settle is an Attachment-Based Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist and Supervisor, trained at the Bowlby Centre. Tori is currently the CEO ofthe Bowlby Centre,having worked in the organisation in many rolesover the last 23 years..

Date: Saturday, 12th December 2020

Time: 11.00am – 1.00pm

Cost: £30  (Bowlby Centre members and students – free)

Venue: Online details to follow registration

CPD: 2 hours (CPD certificate provided)

Download the flyer

BOOKINGS NOW CLOSED

Clinical Forum – Via Video link – THE COUPLE IN MIND: WORKING WITH COUPLES AND WITH INDIVIDUALS IN A COUPLE

Saturday, 14th November 2020   11am – 1pm

Speaker: Jenny Riddell

Synopsis:

Using clinical vignettes, Jenny will present some of the core clinical and theoretical concepts and dynamics which present in couple therapy and in individual therapy where the client is in a couple and bringing the relationship as a focus of the work. There will be space for questions and thinking about your own casework, and an opportunity to discuss referral on if necessary.

About the speaker
Jenny Riddell is a psychoanalytic psychotherapist working with individuals and couples. She is a registered member of The Bowlby Centre and Tavistock Relationships. Her specialist interests are in how a couple grieve, infertility, affairs and working with couples in later life. She has a private practice and writes, supervises, trains, teaches and is academic supervisor for MA dissertations on a variety of psychotherapy trainings. She has worked with Relate, WPF, TR, and is a member of BPC (TR), UKCP (BC), and British a
Association of Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Supervision (BAPPS).

Date: Saturday, 14th November 2020

Time: 11.00am – 1.00pm

Cost: £30  (Bowlby Centre members and students – free)

Venue: Online details to follow registration

CPD: 2 hours (CPD certificate provided)

Download the flyer

Clinical Forum – Via Video link – Some aspects of practicing EMDR

Saturday, 3rd October 2020   11am – 1pm

Speaker: John Henry

Synopsis:

In his talk, John will introduce you to the bare bones of EMDR and share some case histories to illustrate the diversity of this therapy. Disclaimer: this in no way will qualify you to practice EMDR, but John hopes it will encourage you to seek training from an accredited training organisation.

About the speaker

John Henry is a founder member of the Bowlby Centre. He has been in practice as a psychotherapist since the mid-1980s. Just after the turn of the millennium he began work, first as an honorary and later in a paid post at the Maudsley Hospital in the Traumatic Stress Service.
While there he met Sandi Richman, who was heading up the EMDR service in the TSS. He was encouraged to seek training as an EMDR therapist. This was the best move he felt he had made in his career. He has become an EMDR enthusiast because it works more rapidly than other relational and CBT therapies, and with lasting effect.

Date: Saturday, 3rd October 2020

Time: 11.00am – 1.00pm

Cost: £30  (Bowlby Centre members and students – free)

Venue: Online details to follow registration

CPD: 2 hours (CPD certificate provided)

Download the flyer

THE COUPLE IN MIND: WORKING WITH COUPLES AND WITH INDIVIDUALS IN A COUPLE

Speaker: Jenny Riddell

Synopsis: Using clinical vignettes, Jenny will present some of the core clinical and theoretical concepts and dynamics which present in couple therapy and in individual therapy where the client is in a couple and bringing the relationship as a focus of the work. There will be space for questions and thinking about your own casework, and an opportunity to discuss referral on if necessary.

About the speaker, Jenny Riddell

Jenny Riddell is a psychoanalytic psychotherapist working with individuals and couples. She is a registered member of The Bowlby Centre and Tavistock Relationships. Her specialist interests are in how a couple grieve, infertility, affairs and working with couples in later life. She has a private practice and writes, supervises, trains, teaches and is academic supervisor for MA dissertations on a variety of psychotherapy trainings. She has worked with Relate, WPF, TR, and is a member of BPC (TR), UKCP (BC), and British Association of Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Supervision (BAPPS).

Saturday, 21 March 2020

Time:11.00am – 1.00pm (Registration 10.45)

Cost: £30 (Bowlby Centre members and students – free)

Venue: The Bowlby Centre 1 Highbury Crescent, London N5 1RN

Chair of Clinical Forum: Helene Everitt, member of the Bowlby Centre

CPD:2 hours – (CPD certificate provided)

Download Brochure

21st March 2020

Clinical Forum – Data Protection and GDPR: What you needto know(and do) in your everyday practice

Saturday, 9th March 2019

Synopsis:
Graham Johnston will be leading an interactive clinical forum focusing on what we as practitioners need to know and do in response to the recent General Data Protection Regulation. There is quite a degree of fear and confusion in our sector about how the new legislation affects us, so Graham will be trying to settle those nerves and remove some of the confusion. In advance of the forum, Graham will be asking participants to send him their biggest fears or burning questions about the impact of GDPR so that he can make the session as personal and useful as possible. You can send your questions to:graysjjohnston@hotmail.com

About the speakers

Graham Johnston is a graduate of The Bowlby Centre (intake 2010) and works in private practice at his home in Brockley, South East London.
He previously worked in the civil service in a variety of policy and operational roles and is now the Policy Director of The Bowlby Centre, where data protection is one of his lead areas of responsibility.

Date: Saturday, 9th March 2019

Time: 11.00am – 1.00pm (Registration 10.45)

Cost: £30

(Bowlby Centre members and students – free)

Venue: The Bowlby Centre 1 Highbury Crescent, London N5 1RN

CPD: 2 hours (CPD certificate provided)

Download the flyer

Clinical Forum – Data Protection and GDPR: What you needto know(and do) in your everyday practice

Saturday, 9th March 2019

Synopsis:
Graham Johnston will be leading an interactive clinical forum focusing on what we as practitioners need to know and do in response to the recent General Data Protection Regulation. There is quite a degree of fear and confusion in our sector about how the new legislation affects us, so Graham will be trying to settle those nerves and remove some of the confusion. In advance of the forum, Graham will be asking participants to send him their biggest fears or burning questions about the impact of GDPR so that he can make the session as personal and useful as possible. You can send your questions to:graysjjohnston@hotmail.com

About the speakers

Graham Johnston is a graduate of The Bowlby Centre (intake 2010) and works in private practice at his home in Brockley, South East London.
He previously worked in the civil service in a variety of policy and operational roles and is now the Policy Director of The Bowlby Centre, where data protection is one of his lead areas of responsibility.

Date: Saturday, 9th March 2019

Time: 11.00am – 1.00pm (Registration 10.45)

Cost: £30

(Bowlby Centre members and students – free)

Venue: The Bowlby Centre 1 Highbury Crescent, London N5 1RN

CPD: 2 hours (CPD certificate provided)

Download the flyer

Clinical Forum – Speaker: Ruthie Smith

Synopsis: Attachment trauma has major implications for people’s capacity for individuation often resulting in co-dependent relationships, fear of intimacy or separation, living in chronic states of anxiety or disconnection. Trauma is held as stress in the body and scientific research has now proven that traumatic patterns go deep into our cellular memory and DNA. Many people with trauma at conception and in utero, suffer from chronic and undiagnosed PTSD. Energy psychology methods enable us to identify and treat traumatic patterns which are outside conscious awareness, so these methods are particularly useful in working with developmental, abandonment and attachment trauma.

Ruthie Smith will describe how using simple Energy Therapy methods, which clients apply to themselves within relational psychotherapy, makes it possible to treat attachment trauma relatively easily, including pre-verbal trauma such as in utero, pre-birth, birth and early life trauma and the fundamental lack of safety which such trauma engenders. In the process, the client forms a healthy attachment with the therapist, facilitating the experience of the ‘secure base’. The use of energy psychotherapy also provides empowering self-help tools for clients, enabling them to self-regulate their emotions and triggers, bringing them to a state of balance

About the speaker, Ruthie Smith

Ruthie Smith is an Attachment Based Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist with over 30 years experience. She was a therapist and supervisor at the Women’s Therapy Centre founded by Susie Orbach and worked as a Principal Individual Psychotherapist and Supervisor in the NHS.

Ruthie has taught on many psychotherapy training programmes, including at the Bowlby Centre, where she is currently a training supervisor. She has been teaching energy psychotherapy for the past ten years and founded the Flame Centre in central London in 2010 which specialises in treating trauma using energy methods.

Ruthie is senior course director on the new Confer, Practising Energy Psychotherapy Diploma which starts in January 2020 (https://www.confer.uk.com/depth-courses/energy.html ). She has been a speaker on the Confer CPD programmes on a variety of subjects.
Her other interests include spirituality, running mindfulness and theme centred retreats at her Octagon Centre, and music – singing with chamber choir, playing saxophone in various groups.

Saturday, 11 January 2020

Time:11.00am – 1.00pm (Registration 10.45)

Cost: £30 (Bowlby Centre members and students – free)

Venue: The Bowlby Centre 1 Highbury Crescent, London N5 1RN

Chair of Clinical Forum: Helene Everitt, member of the Bowlby Centre

CPD:2 hours – (CPD certificate provided)

11th January 2020

Clinical Forum – History taking and assessment of clients

Saturday, 9th February 2019

Synopsis:
This workshop may be of interest to all psychotherapists – both those in training and experienced therapists. Many Bowlby Centre psychotherapists work with clients in agencies where only short-term therapy is available, and where therapists are required to undertake assessments. How important do we consider assessment to be? Are there essentials that need to be covered? How do we go about assessing? A core value of the Bowlby Centre is that everybody should have access to Attachment Based Psychotherapy – how does this value inform our assessments and can we or should we ever say no? The presentation at this forum is more of a workshop style where we will outline some of the features to consider when making assessment. We will also consider issues relating to assessing risk both at assessment stage and during treatment. The workshop will likely raise more questions than answers but will hopefully open up the field for discussion.

About the speakers

Ruthie Smith is a Psychoanalytic Attachment Based Psychotherapist and Energy Psychotherapist with 30 years’ experience in private practice and 10 years as a Principal Individual Psychotherapist and Supervisor in the NHS. She taught on a number of Psychotherapy Training Programmes including at JBC before founding The Flame Centre in London where she works as a psychotherapist and supervisor. She specialises in work with trauma, having studied a variety of energy therapy modalities which clear PTSD from the body. She teaches alongside Phil Mollon on Converging Streams Energy Psychotherapy courses put on by the Energy Psychotherapy network. Ruthie has regularly lectured on a wide range of subjects for Confer conferences, with a specialist interest in the crossovers between psychotherapy and contemporary spirituality. She runs Flame residential retreats in Norfolk and her other interests include music (jazz and classical).

Date: Saturday, 9th February 2019

Time: 11.00am – 1.00pm (Registration 10.45)

Cost: £30

(Bowlby Centre members and students – free)

Venue: The Bowlby Centre 1 Highbury Crescent, London N5 1RN

CPD: 2 hours (CPD certificate provided)

Download the flyer

Clinical Forum – Masters in the Art of Defence: Working with Avoidant Attachment

Saturday, 8th December 2018 

Synopsis:
Clients with a dismissing/avoidant pattern of attachment can be difficult to engage and frequently leave therapy before any real work can be done. They often evoke uncomfortable feelings in the therapist including boredom, fear, and strong dislike –or may make little impact on us. In this talk, Linda will describe her work with several highly defended dismissing clients and suggest that their internal worlds are governed by shame and self-hatred. This has implications for how we work with such individuals, and the aims of therapeutic work with them. The talk will be followed by refreshments to celebrate the launch of her latest book.

About the speaker Linda Cundy
Linda Cundy trained at the Bowlby Centre in the 1990s. She has taught at a number of psychotherapy trainings for twenty-five years, and instituted a postgraduate diploma in attachment-base therapy at the Wimbledon Guild. She has published a number of papers in professional journals and has contributed to and edited three books to date; Love in the Age of the Internet: Attachment in the Digital Era (Karnac, 2015),Anxiously Attached: Understanding and Workingwith Preoccupied Attachment (Karnac, 2017) and Attachment and the Defence Against Intimacy: Understanding and Working with Avoidant Attachment, Self-Hatred and Shame (Routledge, 2018)

Date: Saturday, 8th December 2018

Time: 11.00am – 1.00pm (Registration 10.45)

Cost: £30 – 

(Bowlby Centre members and students – free)

Venue: The Bowlby Centre 1 Highbury Crescent, London N5 1RN

CPD: 2 hours (CPD certificate provided)

Download the flyer

Clinical Forum – “I DON’T KNOW WHAT IT IS NOT LIVING IN FEAR”: FROM SCAREGIVING TO CAREGIVINGATTACHMENT PERSPECTIVE ON WORKING WITH CLIENTS WITH COMPLEX TRAUMAAND SEX ADDICTION

Saturday, 10th November 2018

Synopsis:
Sexual assault on a young child and other forms of abuse and their psychological aftermath cascades through decades. Apart from shattering one’s mind and sense of selfhood, later this manifests in what we professionals would consider as the client’s reckless behaviour and self harm. When working with complex trauma, we soon learn that paradoxically these harmful ways always carry meaning and make sense within the context of the child spending the majority of time during childhood living in terror. In this forum I will share the story of M, a client who suffered organised abuse and who was diagnosed with DID (Dissociative identity Disorder). M had many parts, some suicidal, some had eating disorders, some disabled and other veryable. However I will focus my attention on M’s sexual addiction and the relational journey which we embarked upon showing that a non-pathologising, non-objectifying approach to the client’s many attachment cries eventually pave the way to intersubjectivity and the need to connect in a more adaptive healthy manner.

About the speaker Orit Badouk Epstein
Orit Badouk Epstein is a UKCP registered attachment based Psychoanalytic psychotherapist, a training supervisor and a training therapist. Shetrained at the Bowlby Centre, London where she is the Editor of the journal Attachment-New Directions in Psychotherapy and Relational Psychoanalysis. She teaches Attachment theory and is the chair of the planning group of the Bowlby Memorial conference. She specialises in attachment theory and trauma and regularly writes and present papers and book chapters on these topics. She runs a private practice and works relationally with individuals, couples and parents. Orit has a particular interest in working with individuals who have experienced extreme abuse and trauma and have displayed symptoms of dissociation. She is the co-author of the book “Ritual Abuse and Mind Control: The Manipulation of Attachment Needs”(Karnac Books), co-editor of the book “Terror within & without”and is the co-editor of the ESTD (European Society for Trauma and Dissociation) newsletter where she regularly writes articles and film reviews.

Date: Saturday, 10th November 2018

Time: 11.00am – 1.00pm (Registration 10.45)

Cost: £30

(Bowlby Centre members and students – free)

Venue: The Bowlby Centre 1 Highbury Crescent, London N5 1RN

CPD: 2 hours (CPD certificate provided)

Download the flyer

Clinical Forum – “FOSTERING FAMILY ATTACHMENTS IN AN AGE OF VIRTUAL RELATIONSHIPS”

Saturday, 13th October 2018

Synopsis:
CHILD-CENTRED ATTACHMENT THERAPY (The CcAT Programme) was developed in
the mid-1990s as a brief assessment and treatment programme to support adoptive families in Essex. Created by Maeja Raicar and social work colleagues, CcAT was then offered independently by them for several years. They worked with a number of adoptive and foster families, as well as with step-families and birth families where parents and children were struggling with attachment and related behavioural difficulties, and quite often with safeguarding issues since attachment and protection are two sides of the same coin.

The therapists’ learning from this period was written up for the Karnac/UKCP series under the title, Child-Centred Atttachment Therapy (2009). In this clinical forum, Maeja will share some of that learning and consider CcAT’s continuing relevance in an age of virtual relationships to helping struggling parents and children to build healthy attachments. Its simple concepts can be applied to therapeutic work with couples struggling with relationship issues, as well as to work with individuals who are stuggling to parent their children effectively.

About the speaker Maeja Raicar
Maeja Raicar trained as a therapist with the Institute for Self-Analysis in the early 1990s, before it evolved into CAPP and, much later, into The Bowlby Centre. Through a synchronicity of happenings, The CcAT Programme was created and piloted by Maeja and colleagues in Essex. She has worked in the field of adoption and fostering for decades, initially as a social worker before qualifying as a therapist. Maeja has a private therapy and supervision practice in Essex

Date: Saturday, 13th October 2018

Time: 11.00am – 1.00pm (Registration 10.45)

Cost: £30

(Bowlby Centre members and students – free)

Venue: The Bowlby Centre 1 Highbury Crescent, London N5 1RN

CPD: 2 hours (CPD certificate provided)

Download the flyer

Clinical Forum – Attachment-based affect regulation as a guiding principle for work place
counselling and stress management training

Saturday, 9th June 2018

Synopsis:
Sally Rose will introduce the Workable Ranges model, which is a visual psychoeducational tool to convey attachment-based affect and stress regulation. This model is used in individual therapy/counselling and across a range of proactive interventions. It positions safe relational and mindful presence at the centre of healthy, regulated and workable states. It illustrates how mobilised or immobilised forms of threat-based dysregulation sit above and below states of balance. This is used as a rationale for relational therapeutic work and different approaches to self-care, resilience, improving working relationships and optimising performance. Examples from clinical work will be given. As the model derives in part from the work of Dan Siegel, who integrates secure attachment states, care-giver and mindful presence, it can also be a tool to reflect on our therapeutic presence as therapists with our clients.

About the speaker Sally Rose
Sally Rose is a UKCP registered psychotherapist originally trained at the Arbours Association. She is also a trained teacher of mindfulness-based interventions. Attachment Theory is her secure base which widened over time to integrate features of body psychotherapy and mindfulness practice. She is strongly committed to attachment-based, embodied relational therapy and to bringing insights informed by it into the workplace. She leads the Staff Counselling and Psychological Support Service at the University of Leeds.
Chair: Tori Settle, Chair of the Clinical Training Committee

Date: Saturday, 9th June 2018

Time: 11.00am – 1.00pm (Registration 10.45)

Cost: £30

(Bowlby Centre members and students – free)

Venue: The Bowlby Centre 1 Highbury Crescent, London N5 1RN

CPD: 2 hours (CPD certificate provided)

Download the flyer

Clinical Forum – Fear of abandonment and angry protest: working with preoccupied clients

Sold Out

Synopsis: This talk will highlight some of the challenges and difficulties of working with preoccupied clients and will propose specific aims and areas of therapeutic focus in the work.

About the speaker, Linda Cundy

trained at the Bowlby Centre in the 1990s and has a private therapy and supervision practice in North London. She has taught for more than twenty years and developed the Postgraduate Diploma in Attachment-Based Therapy at the Wimbledon Guild where she is Lead Tutor. Linda’s publications include a single authored book, Love in the Age of the Internet: Attachment in the Digital Era (Karnac, 2015) and an edited monograph, Anxiously Attached: Understanding and Working with Preoccupied Attachment (Karnac, 2017). A companion monograph, Attachment and the Defence Against Intimacy: Understanding and Working with Avoidant Attachment, Self-Hatred, and Shame is due to be published in 2018.

Saturday, 10 February 2018

Time:11.00am – 1.00pm (Registration 10.45)

Cost: £30 (Bowlby Centre members and students – free)

Venue: The Bowlby Centre 1 Highbury Crescent, London N5 1RN

Chair of Clinical Forum: Helene Everitt, member of the Bowlby Centre

CPD:2 hours – (CPD certificate provided)

Brochure –  10th February 2018

Sold Out

Clinical Forum – The Need for Something more than a Secure Base; is a Secure Base always enough for a Therapeutic Relationship?

Synopsis: In this forum Michaela will be presenting a paper exploring what Bowlby’s concept of a Secure Base means theoretically and clinically. Using clinical examples Michaela will be asking if the Secure Base is always enough and can it always be used.

Through using both Bowlby and Winnicott’s concepts of infant development, the paper is an exploration of what might be at risk for both analysand and therapist when a secure base cannot be used and perhaps the greater risk of when it can.

About the speaker, Michaela Chamberlain

Michaela is an Attachment Based Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist, trained at the Bowlby Centre where she now teaches. Michaela has worked in both the NHS and private sector in learning disability and mental health services for over twenty years and is now in private practice.

About the discussant, Debbie Zimmerman

Debbie Zimmerman is an attachment-based psychoanalytic psychotherapist, who trained at the Bowlby Centre, where she is currently a training therapist, teacher and course tutor. She has been involved in developing and teaching on attachment based counselling courses at the Wimbledon Guild. Having workedin the NHS for a number of years as a psychoanalytic and mentalization based therapist for South London and Maudsley Trust, she is now in private practice.

Time:11.00am – 1.00pm (Registration 10.45)

Cost: £30 (Bowlby Centre members and students – free)

Venue: The Bowlby Centre 1 Highbury Crescent, London N5 1RN

Chair of Clinical Forum: Helene Everitt, member of the Bowlby Centre

CPD:2 hours – (CPD certificate provided)

Brochure –  8th November 2017.pdf

Clinical Forum – Bowlby Centre, International Attachment Network and Institute of Group Analysis
(A threesome workshop: Oedipus revisited?)
John Bowlby: the timeless supervisor*
Arturo Ezquerro**

SPEAKER: This workshop will be convened by Mark Linington, Chair of Bowlby Centre’s Executive Committee.>

The talk will be largely based on Arturo Ezquerro’s experience of fortnightly supervision and mentorship with John Bowlby, at the Tavistock Clinic, during the last 6 years of his life (1984-1990). Bowlby was a humane, enthusiastic, supportive and inspiring supervisor, who encouraged and stimulated open-ended personal and professional development. He provided a reliable secure base from which it was easier to explore new territories and to integrate diverse sources of knowledge. He respected and valued the work and contributions of his colleagues, his supervisees, and the people who had educated him. As a mentor, at no point did he criticise the work of other supervisors, who were mainly of a different theoretical orientation, and saw merit in their contributions. And he offered gentle, deeply caring suggestions that would help patients to become attached, to survive and to grow.

About Arturo Ezquerro

**Arturo Ezquerro, a consultant psychiatrist, psychoanalytic psychotherapist, and group analyst, is senior lecturer, assessor and trainer at the Institute of Group Analysis, and former Head of NHS Medical Psychotherapy Services in Brent, London. He was supervised by John Bowlby at the Tavistock Clinic (1984-1990), has published over 60 articles and book chapters in five languages, and has authored Encounters with John Bowlby: Tales of Attachment (Routledge) and Relatos de Apego (Psimatica).

*This event is part of the Bowlby Centre’s Clinical Forum programme, in association with the Institute of Group Analysis (IGA) and the International Attachment Network (IAN). Members and students of Bowlby Centre, IGA and IAN only have to pay £10 towards catering. The fee for other professionals and public is £30. CPD certificates will be provided.

Venue: IGA, 1 Daleham Gardens, London NW3 5BY

Time: Saturday, 13th May 2017, 12 noon-4.00pm (Registration 10.45)

– 12.00 to 12.30: Registration and coffee

– 12.30 to 01.30: “John Bowlby: the timeless supervisor” by Arturo Ezquerro

– 01.30 to 02.00: Light refreshments

– 02.00 to 03.30: Large group discussion (convened by Mark Linington and Maria Canete)

– 03.30 to 04.00: Light refreshments

Bookings: through the Institute of Group Analysis webpage http://groupanalysis.org

Clinical Forum – Face to Face: Psychotherapy in Black and White

SPEAKER: Charles Brown

How can a black psychotherapist work with the transference and counter transference when working with racial otherness, a direct and present trauma for the black psychotherapist?

This paper examines working with race in psychoanalysis through the exploration of the effect on the patient and the impact on the therapy of the therapist’s black skin. Understanding, through the use of dreams, myth and imagery, allow powerful dynamics to emerge into consciousness. Charles Brown will discuss some clinical examples of patients’ dreams in relation to the image of the black therapist. This is explored through the use and meaning of colour within the patients’ dreams. Charles presents clinical
vignettes, which illustrate the impact of the therapists’ black skin that are linked to the resistance of the patients’ acknowledgement of their own racial stereotypes and its possible significance in the therapy.

About Charles Brown

Charles Brown is a UKCP registered psychoanalytic psychotherapist, clinical supervisor and supervisor of supervision. He qualified from The Guild of Psychotherapists, London in 2006. He is also a specialist addictions therapist and an experienced group facilitator. He is an associate member of AAP, The Bowlby Centre, The APPT.

Charles has experience across the public, voluntary and private sectors. He is the founder of BeMe Therapy, a counselling service for black and ethnic minorities. Charles is also a training therapist, tutor and lecturer. He has a particular interest in identity and race and has published papers in books and journals. He has been in private practice in South London for several years.

Time: Saturday, 13th May 2017, 11.00am – 1.00pm (Registration 10.45)

Cost: £30

(Bowlby Centre members and students – free)

Venue: The Bowlby Centre 1 Highbury Crescent, London N5 1RN

CPD: 2 hours

(CPD certificate provided)

Clinical Forum – Documentary – Controversial Discussions For the XXIst Century

SPEAKER: Liat Levy in conversation with Svetlana Palmer

It is a pleasure to invite you to a screening of the Controversial Discussions For the XXIst Century with the film maker Svetlana Palmer, followed by a conversation, along with Q & A.

Taking both title and spirit from the Controversial Discussions which took place after the death of Freud in wartime London, PEP Web Video Grant Project Winner Controversial Discussions For the XXIst Century examines the history, legacy and contemporary resonance of the discussions regarded by Andre Green as ‘the most important document in the history of psychoanalysis’. The film features contributions from several generations of British psychoanalysts including Anne-Marie Sandler, Peter Fonagy and Riccardo Steiner, as well as proponent of modern attachment theory Allan Schore and founder of neuropsychoanalysis Mark Solms.

In this clinical forum screening of the film will be followed by a conversation as well as Q & A. We will discuss issues raised by the film including historic difficulties in communication and cross-pollination across modalities which remain endemic to contemporary psychotherapy together with integrating recent findings from neuroscience and neurology which back Bowlby’s original ideas about the key role of attachment in human development.

About Liat Levy

Liat is an experienced Psychoanalytic Adult Psychotherapist and Supervisor. Liat is a Training Therapist, Supervisor, and a teacher on the training programme at the Bowlby Centre. For the last ten years she has worked, part-time, as a Senior Adult Psychotherapist within the NHS for Lambeth Integrative Psychological Therapy, which is part of South London and Maudsley Trust. Liat has a lively private practice based in North London, where she offers psychotherapy, as well as clinical supervision.

About Svetlana Palmer

Svetlana is a British documentary film-maker and author. Her credits include BAFTA-nominated Cold War (BBC2/CNN) RTS-winner The Second World War in Colour (ITV) and The First World War (C4). She is co-author of A War in Words (Simon&Schuster 2003) and We Were Young and At War (Collins 2009). Svetlana graduated as a psychodynamic psychotherapist in 2016 and currently developing her private practice in North London alongside her film-making and writing projects.

Time: Saturday, 8th April 2017, 11.00am – 1.00pm (Registration 10.45)

Cost: £30

(Bowlby Centre members and students – free)

Venue: The Bowlby Centre 1 Highbury Crescent, London N5 1RN

CPD: 2 hours

(CPD certificate provided)

Clinical Forum – Reflecting on supervision and diversity –

SPEAKER: Anne Power

It is said that we teach what we need to learn. Anne Power also finds that she writes what she needs to understand, and in writing about supervision and diversity she has tried to address an area that she finds difficult and also which she feels has been underexplored in the literature. She will focus this paper largely on social class because other types of discrimination tend to get more space in the literature, and because she has written about these in an earlier paper (Power, 2009). She writes from within the limitations of her group as a white, middle aged and middle class woman.

Thinking about the challenges of working with diversity in supervision, Anne identified ten aspirations which she will explore:

– Modelling comfort and curiosity about our own identity and its impact
– Normalising and containing discomfort about difference so that reflection is more possible.
– Being alert to the potential transference/ countertransference when the therapist and client are either very diverse, or, very alike in identity.
– Initiating conversations about how diversity is impacting both the therapy and the supervisory relationship.
– Supporting the supervisee’s awareness of her own identity and its impact on clients.
– Offering challenge and feedback on how supervisees respond to, or seem to avoid, issues of difference.
– Challenging our psychological theories and becoming more sensitive to how they may be serving the dominant culture.
– Demonstrating a priori knowledge of other cultures whilst resisting the pull to over-generalise.
– Identifying how the setting where supervision takes place may itself perpetuate inequalities.
– Showing willingness and skill in repairing ruptures in the supervisory relationship and using the potential of such enactments to deepen the work.

Anne Power

Anne Power qualified in attachment-based psychoanalytic psychotherapy at The Bowlby Centre and did an MA in supervision at WPF/ Roehampton. She trained in couple work with Relate. Previously her work was in the NHS and voluntary agencies; she now has a private practice in central London for couples and individuals. Her recent book, Forced Endings in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis: Attachment and loss in retirement, explores the process of closing a practice for retirement or for other reasons. She is UKCP and BACP registered.

Time: Saturday, 14th January 2017, 11.00am – 1.00pm

Clinical – Early thoughts from a newbie therapist

SPEAKER: Graham Johnston

Graham will structure the clinical seminar in particular around his work with a training client, drawing on

key questions that are driving his development as a therapist such as:

– how important is empathetic understanding?

– how important is interpretation?

– do we place too much emphasis on the therapeutic frame and all it contains?

– how do we connect with and relate to those who are most avoidant?

Graham Johnston is currently building a private practice in Brockley, Southeast London after graduating from The Bowlby Centre in 2014. He’s been working for the Government since 2001, but will finish that work at Christmas to concentrate full-time on his therapy practice. His clinical interests include working with young adults struggling to build fulfilling relationships, clients with anger and avoidance issues, and clients with OCD. He balances his work life with looking after two toddlers and, in what little remains of his free time, he runs, listens to podcasts and watches American sport.

Time: Saturday, 10th December 2016, 11.00am – 1.00pm (Registration 10.45)

Clinical Forum – Aspects of Attachment-Based Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy –

SPEAKERS: Mark Linington and Tori Settle

In this clinical forum Mark Linington and Tori Settle will present and explore what it means to work as a psychotherapist from both an attachment theory and psychoanalytic perspective. They will use examples from their extensive clinical experience to reflect on some of the key current areas with which they work, including the nature of the secure base, the significance of the clinician’s experience, the repetition of relational patterns (internal working models) and understanding the therapeutic action.

Mark Linington has been practicing as an attachment-based psychoanalytic psychotherapist for more than fifteen
years, including twelve years in the NHS. He works with adults, children and families who have experienced trauma, including those with intellectual disabilities and long term mental health problems. He is Chair of the Executive Committee at The Bowlby Centre, where he is also a training therapist and training supervisor. He currently works as a psychotherapist and supervisor in a special secondary school in London, at the Clinic for Dissociative Studies and in private practice.

Tori Settle has been practising as an attachment-based psychoanalytic psychotherapist for 16 years and has a full private clinical practice. She is also a trained massage therapist and specialises in working with pregnant mothers and elderly clients. She gave up her massage practice gradually over the years in order to focus solely on the psychotherapeutic work but her interest in working with the body remains. She is Chair of the Clinical Training Committee at the Bowlby Centre and sits on the Executive committee with Mark Linington.

Further Information Mark and Tori have recently co-authored a chapter on Attachment-based Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist in the forthcoming Sage Handbook for Counseling and Psychotherapy due for publication later this year.

Time: Saturday, 8th October 2016, 11.00am – 1.00pm (Registration 10.45)

Cost: £20

(Bowlby Centre members and students – free)

Venue: The Bowlby Centre 1 Highbury Crescent, London N5 1RN

CPD: 2 hours

(CPD certificate provided)

Clinical Forum – GASLIGHT – I feel like I’m going mad, is it me, must be me?

SPEAKER: Orit Badouk Epstein

The 1940s film “Gaslight” is a classic thriller and its strength lies in being psychologically accurate storytelling ahead of its time. Recently, the term “gas-light” has come alive after the broadcasting of the radio drama ‘The Archers’. Since emotional abuse has never received proper public recognition, the revival of the word and its modern interpretation is highly relevant to our work with clients who have been emotionally abused, clients with a poor sense of agency and clients who survived horrendous mind control and torture. From the personal to the societal, I will be discussing the various degrees of gas-lighting, in particular with clients whose lives have been marked by continuous and insidious emotional torment, and how relational approach helps shift their distorted internal working models and sense of selfhood.

Orit Badouk Epstein is an Attachment based Psychoanalytic psychotherapist (UKCP registered) and a supervisor working in private practice. She works relationally with individuals, couples and parents. Orit has a particular interest in working with individuals who have experienced extreme abuse and trauma displaying symptoms of dissociation. She is currently teaching at the Bowlby Centre. Orit is a trustee for the Clinic of Dissociative Studies. She is co-author of the book “Ritual Abuse and Mind Control: The Manipulation of Attachment Needs” (Karnac Books) and co-editor of the book ‘Terror within & without’. She is the associate editor for Journal Attachment New Direction and co-editor of the ESTD (European Society for Trauma and Dissociation) Newsletter where she regularly writes articles, film and book reviews.

Time: Saturday, 16 July 2016, 11.00am – 1.00pm (Registration 10.45)

Cost: £20

(Bowlby Centre members and students – free)

Venue: The Bowlby Centre 1 Highbury Crescent, London N5 1RN

CPD: 2 hours

(CPD certificate provided)

Date: Clinical Forum 7th May 2016 – pdf brochure

Clinical Forum – ATTACHMENT TRAUMA, ENERGY PSYCHOLOGY AND SOUL CONNECTING

SPEAKER: Ruthie Smith

Ruthie is a Psychoanalytic Attachment Based Psychotherapist, energy psychotherapist, teacher and training supervisor. She spent 10 years as a Principal Individual Psychotherapist in the NHS, and has taught on psychotherapy training programmes, Confer events and at The Freud Museum Conference. After training in Energy Psychotherapy methods, she established The Flame Centre in London, and is part of the Energy Psychotherapy Network which includes Phil Mollon and others. She currently teaches on Converging Streams courses in Energy Psychotherapy and also co-leads residential spiritual retreats.

Date: Sunday 21st February 2016, 11am – 1pm

Price: £12.00 per person

“A Dance to the Music of Violence An account of attachment-based psychoanalytic psychotherapy with a survivor of past chronic, unremitting violence and abuse”

 

SPEAKER: Helen Cordery

Date: Saturday, 16th January 2016, 11am – 1pm

Price: £12.00 per person

“I’m Someone With A Future And Not Just A Past”

SPEAKER: Hazel Leventhal

 

Saturday, 16 January 2016 11am – 1pm
“I’m Someone With A Future And Not Just A Past”

SPEAKER: Hazel Leventhal
She first came for therapy aged 45. She was brought up ‘in care’ from the age of
four months and lived in 27 different homes or institutions and went to 18 different
schools, leaving school at the age of 16 without any qualifications. Her body was
plagued by physical ailments. She couldn’t sustain relationships. Her life was
lonely and loveless. This is her story and how therapy helped her to change.
Hazel Leventhal
Hazel trained at The Bowlby Centre where she has taught The Life Cycle seminar
and chaired the Clinical Forum for three years. She has worked as a Samaritan
and cared for her sister who suffered from early-onset Alzheimer’s. She now
works in private practice in Bedfordshire.

Download the pdf brochure

Date: Saturday 12th, December 2015, 11am – 1pm

The Danger of Getting Better

SPEAKER:Liat Levy

Getting better is painful as it often involves a degree of overwhelming sadness, and a capacity to mourn. In the process of attempting to help our patients, one may become aware of ‘a force which is defending itself by every possible means against recovery and which is absolutely resolved to hold on to illness and suffering’ (Freud 1937).

Specifically during treatment the availability of someone who is emphatic, reliable and constant provides an arena where archaic relationships get repeated, as well as providing an entirely new experience for the patient. Such dynamic is likely to stir up a wide array of contradictory feelings such as, yearning, hunger of wanting more, uneasy feelings of greed and envy, as well as feelings of love and hate transferred from early frustrating objects. Thus in the attempt to help our patients, we stirs up affects and longing that are truly difficult to bear.

In this clinical forum Liat will describe a case of a long term patient. Focusing on some of the challenges, as well as the ways in which the therapy aimed to support and promote psychic change, in such manner that it is not acted out nor defended against, but rather tolerated within the patient’s psychic life.

Download the full brochure

Date: Sunday, 15 November 2015, 11am – 1pm

Price: £12.00 per person

Thoughts about suicidality in the therapy relationship

Abstract I hope this to be a presentation of clinical material to think about suicidal feelings expressed in the room. I am hoping in the presentation of the material and in the discussion afterwards to think about the anxiety that I and I suspect other therapists experience when confronted with such material. How do we retain and develop the capacity to think about these feelings particularly when they are experienced frequently and over a long period of time, months and sometimes years.

Sarah Devereux has worked in the NHS in secure mental health services for 16 years. She is clinical lead for Occupational therapy for a secure women’s service and an MBT (Menatalisation based therapy) therapist for a community service for those who have received as diagnosis of personality disorder. She is as a Bowlby Centre trained psychotherapist.

Tori Settle s the Chair of the clinical training committee and has been a teacher and course tutor for the Bowlby Centre for the last 12 years. She has a private practice and is a training supervisor for the centre also.

Download the full brochure

Date: Saturday, 10th October 2015 11am – 1pm

Price: £12.00 per person

War – Psychoanalysis and the Unspeakable

Abstract – This presentation starts with a short film, “letters of service” directed by Duncan Wellaway. This is the true story of a man who had been in a psychiatric institution for 80 years following service in the First World War. This presentation examines the place of War in psychoanalysis, including relational psychotherapy informed by Attachment Theory and considers the role of War in the development of psychoanalysis and the therapeutic community movement. Drawing on clinical work with a patient, a former serviceman who had experienced active service in Bosnia and subsequent complex trauma, who was resident in a therapeutic community. Including images from War Propaganda, Poetry and War photography, This presentation examines the themes of confidentiality, transference, vicarious trauma, vulnerability, common humanity and gender.

Speaker Kate Brown is a Bowlby Centre trained UKCP registered attachment based psychoanalytic psychotherapist who started her career in therapeutic communities working with adults with a variety of mental health difficulties, and with adolescents individually and in groups. She has worked with young mothers and in mainstream community psychiatric services with patients’ families. She has also provided time limited therapy with former servicemen who had experienced complex trauma. She teaches at The Bowlby Centre and has also delivered freelance training. Kate completed an MSc in psychotherapeutic approaches in mental health in 2012. She is a member of the Attachment Journal editorial group, former chair of the clinical forum at The Bowlby Centre. Kate has recently begun a PhD in the psychoanalysis department at Middlesex University in the history of the therapeutic community movement and the treatment of trauma. Kate has recently moved to Bournemouth where she will be developing a private practice.

Discussant Natalie Scales is a Senior Manager for Community Housing & Therapy (CHT). She has a background in Psychology and has worked in Therapeutic Communities for the past 8 years, including managing a dispersed community for ex-service personnel. Currently she is mummy to 2 boys, as well as managing marketing and sales for CHT.

Download the full brochure

Date: Saturday, 26 September 2015 11pm – 1pm

Price: £12.00 per person

Who’s Life Are You Living?
Echoism: a relationship dominated by the Other

SPEAKERS: Elisa Morris, Mark Linington and Nell Montgomery

As psychotherapists we are all probably familiar not only with the myth of Narcissus, but also with the self and relational difficulties that one faces with being narcissistic. In this story there was a lesser known person – Echo – who also has something to say to us about relational life.

In this Clinical Forum three clinicians: Elisa Morris, Mark Linington and Nell Montgomery, will present a new theory they have been developing by bringing together their clinical experiences and the story of Echo. The Forum will bring examples from their work to illustrate the themes, difficulties and possible ways of helping someone who is disabled by the nature of their focus on the other, at the expense of their sense of self.

Our Speakers
Mark is an attachment based-psychoanalytic psychotherapist and child psychotherapist. He trained with The Bowlby Centre, where he is Chair of the Executive Committee, a Training Therapist, Clinical Supervisor and Research Lead. He has worked for 12 years in the NHS as a psychotherapist with people with learning disabilities who have experienced trauma and abuse. Currently, he works as psychotherapist for the Clinic for Dissociative Studies, at a secondary school for young people with complex needs, and in private practice with children and adults.

Nell is an attachment based-psychoanalytic psychotherapist. She trained at The Bowlby Centre. She works with adults as a psychotherapist in private practice and for the Pottergate Centre for Trauma and Dissociation. She is a Partner at The Preston Associates, where she is an Executive Coach working with senior leaders and leadership teams across a variety of industries. She is a coach at Insead’s Global Leadership Centre in Paris.

Elisa is an integrative psychotherapist, having completed a transpersonal psychotherapy training at the Centre for Counselling and Psychotherapy Education (CCPE) in London. She currently works with adults in private practice in Bath. Previously she has worked for four years in Primary Care. She is a lead member of the Counsellors’ Collective South West, an organisation working to improve access to high quality therapy across this region. She is completing her supervision training at the Centre for Supervision and Team Development in
Bath.

Saturday, 20th June 2015
SPEAKER: Mark Linnington

‘Who Cares?

Mark Linington will present his long term psychotherapy with a man who was abused in his
family and then in care. He will describe the impacts of these attachment traumas on the
careseeking, caregiving and other attachment-based systems of this young man, show how
these emerged in the psychotherapeutic relationship, and explore how he worked with them
and the influence of his own care needs.
Our speaker
Mark is an attachment based-psychoanalytic psychotherapist and child psychotherapist. He
trained with The Bowlby Centre, where he is Chair of the Executive Committee, a Training
Therapist, Clinical Supervisor and Research Lead. He has worked for 12 years in the NHS as a
psychotherapist with people with learning disabilities who have experienced trauma and abuse.
Currently, he works as psychotherapist for the Clinic for Dissociative Studies, at a secondary
school for young people with complex needs, and in private practice with children and adults.

‘Who Cares? – Download a pdf flyer here

Saturday, 9th May 2015
SPEAKER: Orit Badouk Epstein

‘Who needs who? – the roots of traumatic disappointment, often shown in
clients with preoccupied attachment style’

When teaching on the attachment short course participants are often less clear of how preoccupied
attachment patterns translate relationally in adulthood and in the clinical setting. As with all insecure
attachment styles, the clinical work with the preoccupied clients often entails the gathering of internal and
external records of the accumulative traumatic events and experiences, sustained early on in life by their care
givers that can only give rise to forces that interfere with the client’s movement towards mental
wellbeing. The journey I embark upon with my preoccupied clients, therefore, is not so dissimilar to the one
I have with all my other clients but one that more painfully confronts the client’s need to mourn their
relentless disappointment in their wistful searching and yearning for the ideal care-giver. We also need to
pay attention to the client’s vested interest empowered by a protective need to keep things exactly as they
have always been, and by doing so, feeling helplessness and indecisiveness and ‘sitting on the fence’ . In
doing so, the client is not fully aware of his need to constantly recreate the past in the present. This
presentation meant to shed some light into the work with these clients and share some effective ways of
overcoming the client’s feeling of being stuck in relentless hope.

‘Who needs who? – the roots of traumatic disappointment, often shown in clients with preoccupied attachment style’ Download a pdf flyer here

Archived Pschotherapy Training Courses

Attachment and Complex Trauma – October 2021

Saturday, 23 and Sunday 24 October 2021
and
Saturday, 30 and Sunday 31 October 2021

10.00am – 4.00pm

Cost: £600

The course will be covering key principles of attachment theory as it originated by John Bowlby and Mary Ainsworth along with its application in clinical practice.

In addition, the course will teach about the Disorganised attachment status and its characteristics as is often shown in clients who suffer complex trauma and the intergenerational transmission of trauma.

The emphasis on teaching disorganised attachment and complex trauma has arisen based on the demand from practitioners who often find themselves grappling with challengingsituations when working with the more traumatised client groups.

The course is aimed at therapists, psychologists, counsellors, social workers, GPs and other practitioners in the caring profession who want to expand their understanding of attachment theory with the emphasises on complex trauma, intergenerational transmission of trauma and adverse childhood experiences.

Participants will be meeting in person and the numbers of places is limited.

Seminar Leader

Orit Badouk Epstein is a UKCP registered Attachment based Psychoanalytic psychotherapist, a trainee supervisor and a trainee therapist. She trained at the Bowlby Centre, London where she is the Editor of the journal “Attachment-New Directions in Psychotherapy and Relational Psychoanalysis”. She specialises in attachment theory and trauma and regularly lectures, teaches, writes and present papers and book chapters on these topics and consults worldwide on attachment theory. She runs a private practice and works relationally with individuals, couples and parents. Orit has a particular interest in working with individuals who have experienced extreme abuse and trauma and have displayed symptoms of dissociation. She is the co-author of the books “Ritual Abuse and Mind Control: The Manipulation of Attachment Needs” (Badouk Epstein, Wingfield & Schwartz, 2011 Karnac), “Terror within & without” (Yellin, Badouk Epstein, 2013, Karnac), Shame Matters, Routledge (in Press) and was the co-editor of the ESTD (European Society for Trauma and Dissociation) newsletter for 10 years as well as being a regular contributor of articles and film reviews. In her spare time Orit enjoys the cinema, reading philosophy and writing poetry.

Download The Flyer

Becoming Secure: What Are The Ingredients of a Successful Psychotherapy?

Date: Saturday 11th and Sunday 12th January 2020
Time: 10 am to 4pm Saturday, 10 am to 3pm Sunday
Cost: £200, £175 Bowlby Centre members, £150 Bowlby Centre students
Venue: Resource for London, 356 Holloway Rd, London, N7 6PA

COURSE FULL

Attachment Theory has always integrated findings from related disciplines. Bowlby’s thinking was influenced by concepts from ethology, animal research and information processing. More recently, it has benefitted from research into linguistics, the effects of trauma, neuroscience, and contemporary developmental theories. But what does this mean for the practice of attachment-informed psychotherapy? If the overall aim is secure attachment, what needs to happen in an effective therapy to bring that about?

This two-day seminar will propose key ingredients, areas of focus in clinical work that facilitate ‘earned security.’ While each individual client is unique, and the balance of ingredients will also vary according to core attachment style, anxieties and defences, these areas of focus can be helpful throughout the lifetime of each therapy; as part of the assessment process, as a framework to review the work, and as part of ending. It also provides a guide when
therapies get stuck, as part of supervision, and for self-supervision There will be ample opportunities throughout these two days to reflect on clinical material in the light of these ‘key ingredients.’

Linda Cundy is an attachment-based psychoanalytic psychotherapist and supervisor in private practice in north London. As an independent trainer she has twenty-five years’ experience of teaching, including setting up a
postgraduate diploma in attachment-based therapy. She has contributed to and edited three books to date; “Love in the Age of the Internet: Attachment in the Digital Era” (2015, Karnac), “Anxiously Attached: Understanding and Working with Preoccupied Attachment” (2017, Karnac) and “Attachment and the Defence Against Intimacy: Understanding and Working With Avoidant Attachment, Self-Hatred, and Shame” (2018, Routledge).

Attachment Theory in Clinical Practice – October – COURSE FULL

Saturday 19th and Sunday 20th October 2019 and
Saturday 2nd and Sunday 3rd November 2019

Cost: £580 Organisations, £540 Individuals

Seminars will include the following themes

• Introductions – our relationship to attachment theory.
• Attachment theory in context
• Separation, loss and mourning
• Patterns of attachment and their internal representation
• Secure • Dismissing • Preoccupied • Unresolved/disorganised • Not classifiable
• Evaluating adult attachment states of mind
• Internal working models
• Reflective functioning
• Intersubjectivity

Clinical work will consider the role of mourning, narrative, mutuality and recognition, affective attunement and cycles of rupture and repair in the therapeutic process.

The objectives of this course is to introduce Attachment theory and deepen your understanding of it. It’s designed to be of practical value with implications for therapy and human relatedness.

The course is aimed for Counsellors, Psychotherapists, Psychologists, Psychiatrists and Social Workers.

“I was surprised how this course touched on all areas of my life… for me it has been the missing piece of the jigsaw I have been looking for and brings together many things…”

Orit Badouk Epstein is a UKCP registered attachment based Psychoanalytic psychotherapist, a training supervisor and a training therapist. She trained at the Bowlby Centre, London where she is the Editor of the journal Attachment-New Directions in Psychotherapy and Relational Psychoanalysis (published by Karnac books). She teaches Attachment theory and is the head of the planning group of the International Bowlby Memorial conference. She specialises in attachment theory and trauma and regularly writes and present papers on these topics. She runs a private practice and works relationally with individuals, couples and parents. Orit has a particular interest in working with individuals who have experienced extreme abuse and trauma and have displayed symptoms of dissociation. She is the co-author of the book “Ritual Abuse and Mind Control: The Manipulation of Attachment Needs” (Karnac Books), co-editor of the book “Terror within & without”, and is the co-editor of the ESTD (European Society for Trauma and Dissociation) newsletter where she regularly writes articles and film reviews.

COURSE FULL

Attachment Theory in Clinical Practice

Saturday 19th and Sunday 20th October 2019 and
Saturday 2nd and Sunday 3rd November 2019

Cost: £580 Organisations, £540 Individuals

Download the pdf brochure

Adult Attachment Interview Training Workshop – November 2019

10 Days
Monday, November 4th – Friday, November 8th  plus
Monday, November 11th – Friday, November 15th

Cost: £2000  (deposit of £385 payable on booking with the balance payable on invoice when accepted on the course)

Non-refundable deposit payable upon booking, no later than 1st August 2019

Balance due on acceptance of course, no later than 21 October 2019

Applicants not accepted will be refunded their deposit monies.

The Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) developed by Mary Main and colleagues at the University of California at Berkeley, investigates an individual’s current mental representations of attachment-related experiences from childhood. Adult Attachment Interview Institutes last ten days, and are usually held Monday through Friday of two weeks in succession. One transcript is assigned over the weekend, hopefully leaving you time to take one day off.

The AAI institute is intensive and involves analysis of about 7 or 8 AAI transcripts in succession. Meetings take place about 5–6 hours a day (though sometimes considerably more time is needed to discuss a particular case). Their central purpose is to discuss scoring and classification of the transcript assigned for the previous night, which will also take you at least 6 hours to prepare. In addition to the group meeting, we will be available to see individuals or small groups another hour each day if necessary.

The cost for the institute is USD 2600 (GBP 2000), which includes training, training materials, refreshment & snack during the two weeks as well as reliability testing and associated materials.

The maximum number of participants is 20.

Kazuko Behrens, Ph.D.
Assoc. professor
Dept. of Social Behavioral Sciences
State University of New York
Tel. + 1 315 787 3964
E-mail: behrenk@sunypoly.edu

Pehr Granqvist, Ph D
Professor
Developmental psychology
Stockholm University
Tel. + 46 73 616 26 12
E-mail: pehr.granqvist@psychology.su.se

Download Flyer

Introduction To AEDP – Poetry In Motion: Dyadic Regulation Of Emotion And Transformation Of Self – COURSE FULL

Saturday 16th November 2019

10.00am – 4.30pm

Cost: £150

In this one day workshop we will introduce Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy (AEDP), a transformative, non pathological model of change developed by Dr Diana Fosha in New York. Drawing on the art and science of psychotherapy, Angela Massucco and Dr Heather Gretton, will introduce AEDP as a healing oriented, experiential, attachment based psychotherapy that translates affective neuroscience and developmental research, into the musicality of AEDP language as an unfolding, moment to moment, therapeutic dance. AEDP is an approach that seeks glimmers of potential healing from the moment of meeting. Engaging the client through a collaborative process, the therapist privileges the healing potential of the relationship to undo aloneness, regulate anxiety, and provide the safety necessary to process previously avoided affective experience.

The body is a vessel for emotional experience. Within the body, felt experience is sensed, encoded in the brain and re-experienced within the brain and body. Through the exquisite attunement between therapist and client, the therapist accompanies the client to access their affective experience, and to regulate and deepen waves of emotion to completion. Out of these completed waves of emotion, relief and hope can emerge, and new adaptive action can come alive. Through meta processing, the therapist engages the person in a self-reflective process, bringing implicit experience into mindful awareness that supports the deepening of the transformational experience. AEDP detects glimmers of hope, undoing fear and shame so that joy and a compassionate and coherent sense of self can emerge. In this introductory workshop Angela Massucco and Dr Heather Gretton, will explore how creative and scientific elements of AEDP meet to access hidden resources, and release resilience and positive growth at the very core of self.

COURSE FULL

Presenters:
Angela Massucco is an Attachment based Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist and trained at Bowlby Centre. She is an AEDP Therapist and Emotionally Focused Couples Therapist and holds a Psychosexual Certificate with Tavistock Relationships. She is an Art Therapist and Gestalt Arts Coach. Integral to influencing her work is Dr Fosha’s AEDP for Individuals and David Mars development of her work for couples (AEDPfC). Inspiring her work with emotional depth and a well spring of hope for transformational change in individuals and couples. She enjoys the creative process in devising workshops and welcomes Dr Gretton to the UK. She works in private practice in the City of London and in Cambridge.
.
Dr Heather Gretton is a psychologist and AEDP Therapist in private practice in British Columbia, Canada. Dr Gretton is involved with the AEDP Institute Research Team. She is interested in the weaving together of science, theory, and clinical knowledge with the authentic and therapeutic use of the self in psychotherapy, to promote transformational change and wellness. Her background includes AEDP for individuals and couples; Adult-Attachment based Psychotherapy;
Cognitive Behavioural Therapy; Mindfulness based Therapies, Emotionally Focused Therapy for Couples, and Gottman Method Couples Therapy. She has presented at workshops, conferences and published articles in academic journals nationally and internationally.

Download Flyer

Attachment Theory in Clinical Practice – February, March

COURSE FULL

Saturday 24th February and Sunday 25th February 2018

and Saturday 10th March and Sunday 11th March 2018

Cost: £580 Organisations, £540 Individuals

Seminars will include the following themes

• Introductions – our relationship to attachment theory.
• Attachment theory in context
• Separation, loss and mourning
• Patterns of attachment and their internal representation
• Secure • Dismissing • Preoccupied • Unresolved/disorganised • Not classifiable
• Evaluating adult attachment states of mind
• Internal working models
• Reflective functioning
• Intersubjectivity

Clinical work will consider the role of mourning, narrative, mutuality and recognition, affective attunement and cycles of rupture and repair in thetherapeutic process.

The objectives of this course is to introduce Attachment theory and deepen your understanding of it. It’s designed to be of practical value with implications for therapy and human relatedness.

The course is aimed for Counsellors, Psychotherapists, Psychologists, Psychiatrists and Social Workers.

“I was surprised how this course touched on all areas of my life… for me it has been the missing piece of the jigsaw I have been looking for and brings together many things…”

“Attachment theory is at the core of our being. This course has opened my eyes”
 
“I benefited greatly from this course both personally and professionally.”

Orit Badouk Epstein is a UKCP registered attachment based Psychoanalytic psychotherapist, a training supervisor and a training therapist. She trained at the Bowlby Centre, London where she is the Editor of the journal Attachment-New Directions in Psychotherapy and Relational Psychoanalysis (published by Karnac books). She teaches Attachment theory and is the head of the planning group of the International Bowlby Memorial conference. She specialises in attachment theory and trauma and regularly writes and present papers on these topics. She runs a private practice and works relationally with individuals, couples and parents. Orit has a particular interest in working with individuals who have experienced extreme abuse and trauma and have displayed symptoms of dissociation. She is the co-author of the book “Ritual Abuse and Mind Control: The Manipulation of Attachment Needs” (Karnac Books), co-editor of the book “Terror within & without”, and is the co-editor of the ESTD (European Society for Trauma and Dissociation) newsletter where she regularly writes articles and film reviews.

Attachment Theory in Clinical Practice

Saturday 24th February and Sunday 25th February 2018

and Saturday 10th March and Sunday 11th March 2018

Cost: £580 Organisations, £540 Individuals

COURSE FULL

Attachment Theory in Clinical Practice Brochure

Hold Me Tight: Conversations for Connection – 22nd and 23rd April 2017

SOLD OUT

An interactive Emotionally Focused Couples Therapy workshop

Creating resilience, emotional depth and trust in long term relationships

This is an interactive relational education programme for couples based on the book
Hold Me Tight: Seven Conversations for a Lifetime of Love’ by Dr. Sue Johnson, the
founder of Emotionally Focused Couples Therapy (EFT). This experiential workshop
comprises a weekend of deep engaging conversations that help couples develop more
openness, responsiveness and trust in each other that transforms long term
relationships.
Our aim: You will learn to understand and change the negative relational dance that keeps you
apart and causes conflict. Shape a more secure loving bond based on open intimate
dialogues. To begin a transformative healing experience and to bring back aliveness,
emotional intimacy, sexual connection and joy in your relationship.
This workshop is offered to Psychotherapists, Counsellors, Psychologists and their
partners: for a maximum of eight couples (sixteen participants) to ensure a safe space
for every couple to be supported by EFT therapists in connecting with each other. Each
couple will be given time and support to process their emotional responses to the
shared exercises and watch video clips of couples taking part in Hold Me Tight sessions
with Dr. Sue Johnson.

Date: 22nd and 23rd April 2017
Time: 10.00am to 4.00pm
Cost:£500 per couple (Maximum 8 couples)

Angela Massucco is an Attachment based Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist UKCP and
trained at Bowlby Centre. She is an Emotionally Focused Couples Therapist and holds
an Adv Dip in Couples & Psychosexual Therapy and a Psychosexual Certificate with
TCCR. She is also an Art Therapist BAAT. Her experience of EFT, and Diana Fosha
AEDP Training has impacted deeply personally and professionally with these
experiential models that believe emotional intimacy is at the core of a rich relationship.
Angela is in full time practice at Number 42, The Complete Psychotherapy Practice,
London Bridge.
Helene Igwebuike is a certified Emotionally Focused Therapist and Supervisor
approved by the International Centre for Excellence in Emotionally Focused Therapy
(ICEEFT). Helene uses an integrative model incorporating elements of Person-centred,
Systemic Practice, Psychodynamic and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), while
specialising in Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT), which focuses on accessing
emotions and facilitating heart-to-heart conversations that create a safe and secure
relationship. Helene’s practice is based in Enfield, King’s Cross and online Skype
sessions.

SOLD OUT

Undoing Aloneness: Introduction to Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy (AEDP)

Saturday 24th June 2017  COURSE FULL

In this one day workshop we will outline the four state AEDP model of change as developed by Dr Diana Fosha in New York AEDP is attachment based and experiential way of working with individuals that aims to ‘Undo Aloneness’ at the core of client self and fully encourages positive growth in their relationships. By working with trauma and loss and the painful consequences, therapist and client work together to discover places within that have always been strong, places that were never broken. By harnessing glimmers of vitality AEDP uses transformational processes in the psychotherapy journey – to deepen and expand emotion and accelerate positive healing and growth towards oneself. To ‘Undo Aloneness’ in their internal world and world of relationships as Van der Kolk says, ”to be safe in the here and now you have to give patients what they needed in the there and then”.

AEDP engages clients in the process of healing from the first moment of therapy. It honors somatic experience, emotion and the therapy relationship to melt defences, it tracks and meta processes emotion that is frozen to awaken innate healing energy. A positive moment in the process may well be an intensely felt painful experience that is both raw and opens the client to genuine possibility of change. Angela and Fumie will present this four state model and the specific elements that assist accelerated healing with video tape/s of a session/s revealing how AEDP can move a client from a distant and defended stance to gradually softening and the release of authentic emotion. This one day workshop aims to offer practical, (including work in pairs) and powerful, creative skills for your work as a therapist.
In AEDP the therapist aims to provide a safe haven and secure base to explore together the previously unbearable overwhelming experiences/emotions to undo aloneness and unleash the adaptive action tendencies s/he always possessed, but never had a chance to utilize creatively with positive effect. We are delighted to introduce Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy – with its subtle, powerful focus on sensitive attunement – accompanied with courageous heart.

Date: Saturday 24th June 2017  SOLD OUT
Time: 10.00am to 5.00pm
Cost:£150

Angela Massucco is an Attachment based Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist UKCP and trained at Bowlby Centre. She is an Emotionally Focused Couples Therapist and holds an Adv Dip in Couples & Psychosexual Therapy and a Psychosexual Certificate with TCCR. She is also an Art Therapist BAAT. Her experience of completing Diana Fosha AEDP Individual and Couples Training in New York has impacted deeply personally and professionally with these experiential models that believe emotional intimacy is at the core of a rich relationship. She also co presents Hold Me Tight Workshops for therapists and their partners at Bowlby Centre. Angela is in full time practice at Number 42, The Complete Psychotherapy Practice, London Bridge.

Fumie Kamitoh is a Japanese Certified Clinical Psychologist based in Tokyo. She received her training in US, returned to Japan and provides individual and couples therapy in Japanese and English in private practice. EFT, AEDP and attachment theory has a profound impact on Fumie and now she sees herself and the world through the attachment lens. Fumie has undertaken AEDP training, Immersion, Essential Skills 1 with ongoing Essential Skills 2. She serves as AEDP Japan coordinator and started the Salon in Tokyo in 2016. She presents at conferences and facilitates Experiential Groups in Tokyo and Osaka. This is Fumie’s first professional AEDP engagement in the UK and she is looking forward to presenting at Bowlby Centre.

Attachment Theory in Clinical Practice 2017, 2 weekends (June)

SOLD OUT

Presented by: Orit Badouk Epstein

Seminars will include the following themes

  • Introductions – our relationship to attachment theory
  • Attachment theory in context
  • Separation, loss and mourning
  • Patterns of attachment and their internal representation
  • Secure • Dismissing • Preoccupied • Unresolved/disorganised • Not classifiable
  • Evaluating adult attachment states of mind
  • Internal working models
  • Reflective functioning
  • Intersubjectivity

Clinical work will consider the role of mourning, narrative, mutuality
and recognition, affective attunement and cycles of rupture and
repair in the therapeutic process.
“I was surprised how this course touched on all areas of my life… for
me it has been the missing piece of the jigsaw I have been looking for and
brings together many things…”

Date: June 2017
Time: 10.00am to 4pm on Saturday 3rd and Sunday 4th, and Saturday 17th and Sunday 18th
Cost: £580 Organisations, £540 Individuals

SOLD OUT

“WHEN MUMMY WANTS YOU TO DIE”: UNCONSCIOUS DEATH WISHES AND THE INFANTICIDAL ATTACHMENT

A Special Event with Professor Brett Kahr

Every human being has, from time to time, wished someone else dead. Fortunately, most of us manage to verbalise our hatred in a safe fashion. But what happens when one harbours murderous rage towards another person and does not always know about it? Do unconscious death wishes really exist? And what impact do they have, especially parental death wishes towards infants and children?

Drawing upon nearly forty years of work in the mental health field, Brett Kahr will present the latest version of his theory of the role of unconscious parental death wishes in the genesis of child and adult psychopathology, and will explore the dynamics of the “infanticidal attachment”, and how this destroys intimacy across the lifespan. Kahr will also discuss the ways in which the infanticidal attachment style manifests itself in the psychotherapeutic process and how clinicians can become more proficient in both the diagnosis and treatment of death wishes and their long-term impact.

This workshop will consist of theoretical and clinical presentations as well as “live” supervision of clinical material from participants. This training event will be ideal for all mental health professionals who work with challenging cases, especially colleagues steeped in the treatment of individuals and families struggling with psychosis, borderline states, post-traumatic stress disorder, and related states.

About Professor Brett Kahr

Professor Brett Kahr has worked in the mental health field since 1976. He is currently Senior Fellow at the Tavistock Centre for Couple Relationships at the Tavistock Institute of Medical Psychology, in London. He also holds the post of Senior Clinical Research Fellow in Psychotherapy and Mental Health at the Centre for Child Mental Health. He has enjoyed a long relationship with The Bowlby Centre, and has served as its Consultant in Psychology since 1992. Author of eight books and series editor of more than forty additional volumes in the fields of forensic mental health and in the history of psychoanalysis, he also serves as Trustee of the Freud Museum London. His most recent book is entitled Tea with Winnicott. His forthcoming book on The Traumatic Roots of Schizophrenia will be published in late 2016.

Saturday, 26th November, 2016

Please note venue will be: Resource for London, 356 Holloway Road, London, N7 6PA

4 Day Externship In Emotionally Focused Couples Therapy – This course is full

with Scott Woolley from San Diego Center for EFT

Speaker: Professor Scott Woolley

The Externship in EFT is a four-day foundation training in Emotionally Focused Couples Therapy and a pre-requisite for Core Skills training and EFT Certification. It includes an overview of all aspects of the model including steps and stages, interventions, adult attachment theory, and application of EFT with couples and families. The Externship material is taught with a variety of teaching methods including lectures, interactive discussions, experiential small group work – supported by EFT therapists, video demonstrations and ‘live’ couple sessions.

Who Should Attend?

We welcome applications from psychotherapists, counsellors and mental health clinicians who work with couples and those interested in doing so. This evidence-based model and training is specifically focused on EFT with couples. We highly encourage participants to read Dr Sue Johnson’s Creating Connections (2004), the basic text of EFT, before the start of the Externship.

Brief Objectives:

Externship participants learn how to view relationship distress from an attachment perspective, help partners reprocess the emotional experiences that led to their relationship distress, help couples create new bonding events, and work with clinical impasses. Participants will learn the steps and stages of the model, interventions most commonly used, and how to work with the couple’s vulnerability by deepening affect and tracking their underlying interactional pattern. The four-day Externship in Emotionally Focused Therapy will show how by working with this attachment-based experiential person-centred and systemic model, you can work through conflict to arrive at connection. It will help you become successful in your work with couple relationships and enhance your empathy for others and strengthen your own relationships. We know from recent research (Levenson and Sandberg, 2010) that attending an EFT Externship offers a powerful and hopeful learning experience. The EFT Externship was developed by Dr Sue Johnson and other EFT Trainers over the past 15 years.

Scott R. Woolley, PhD, served for 17 years as Director of the Couple and Family Therapy Masters and Doctoral Programs at Alliant International University. He is a founder and Director of the San Diego Center for Emotionally Focused Therapy and the Executive Director of the Training and Research Institute for EFT at Alliant (TRI-EFT Alliant). He is an AAMFT Clinical Member and Approved Supervisor, and a Certified EFT Therapist, Supervisor, and Trainer.

He has trained therapists in EFT in Canada, Chili, Finland, Great Britain, Guam, Hong Kong, Ireland, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Norway, Russia, Sweden, Taiwan, The Netherlands, and throughout the U.S., and works closely with EFT founder Dr Susan Johnson.

Working with Professor Scott Woolley:

Angela Massucco UKCP ICEEFT, Attachment based Couples and Individual Psychotherapist, Helene Igwebuike BACP ICEEFT Certified EFT Therapist and Supervisor.

Therapists need to be working clinically to attend the Externship.

Date: 29th June to 2nd July 2016

Attachment Theory in Clinical Practice, 2016 weekends –  This course is full

Presented by: Orit Badouk Epstein

Seminars will include the following themes

  • Introductions – our relationship to attachment theory
  • Attachment theory in context
  • Separation, loss and mourning
  • Patterns of attachment and their internal representation
  • Secure • Dismissing • Preoccupied • Unresolved/disorganised • Not classifiable
  • Evaluating adult attachment states of mind
  • Internal working models
  • Reflective functioning
  • Intersubjectivity

Clinical work will consider the role of mourning, narrative, mutuality
and recognition, affective attunement and cycles of rupture and
repair in the therapeutic process.
“I was surprised how this course touched on all areas of my life… for
me it has been the missing piece of the jigsaw I have been looking for and
brings together many things…”

Course Full

Date: Saturday 4th June and Sunday 5th June 2016, Saturday 18th June and Sunday 19th June 2016
Time: 10.00am to 4.00pm
Cost:£540 Organisations, £480 Individuals,  (£400 for Bowlby Centre members)

Exploring the Dynamics of Attachment in Adult Life™ – COURSE FULL – see below for alternative dates in June

This is a 3 day course for professionals offering an opportunity to explore one’s own experience of attachment dynamics in the context of a confidential closed experiential group. The work will be supported by didactic input and time for reflection, application and analysis.

Dr Una McCluskey. Psychoanalytic and Systemic Psychotherapist (UKCP)

Part time Senior Research Fellow at the University of York and freelance Attachment Consultant. Author of To be Met as a Person: the Dynamics of Attachment in Professional Encounters. Karnac London, co-author of The Psychodynamics of abuse: the cost of fear, Jessica Kingsley, and joint author with Dr Dorothy Heard and Dr Brian Lake of Attachment Therapy with Adolescents and Adults: theory and practice post Bowlby 2009.

Presented with the Award for Vision, Innovation, Dedication and Achievement (VIDA) in 2004 by the Group Psychotherapy Association of Southern California in appreciation of her contribution to the field of psychotherapy.

COURSE CONTENT

This course seeks to address the fact that as we work in jobs that require us to respond to the needs of others, too often we don’t create the conditions to support our own personal and psychological development.

Experiences of careseeking and caregiving have their roots in infancy and shape our expectations and responses to careseeking and caregiving in adult life.

As professionals offering a service in the field of mental health and social care we will be aware of the many different ways that people express their careseeking needs, and how difficult it is sometimes to interpret these accurately and respond. People who have had contradictory experiences of caregiving will often tend to miscue professional caregivers so that any attempt at caregiving is frustrated and can end up as a frustrating experience for both parties.

The dynamics of attachment consist of several goal-corrected systems. These are careseeking, caregiving, sexuality, exploratory interest sharing with peers, the personal system for self defence, the internal supportive or unsupportive environments and the personally created external supportive environment (home/lifestyle). The theory suggests that these systems work together as a single process to contribute to and maintain maximum wellbeing. Each session will have a short didactic input on the attachment system to be explored that day, followed by two experiential groups with a short break in between. There will be time to identify what people are learning, discovering or applying to their own practice. Una McCluskey has been researching attachment dynamics for many years and will seek permission from the group to continue this work.

Thursday 10th March 2016

Friday 11th March 2016

Saturday 12th March 2016

FEE: £480 for Bowlby Centre members and £525 for non-members

To be held at The Bowlby Centre, 1 Highbury Crescent, London, N5 1RN

See below for alternative dates in June

Please see www.unamccluskey.com for further details.

Una McCluskey, DPhil., Wold Farm, Kilnwick Percy, York. YO42 1SN

Email: info@unamccluskey.com Website: www.unamccluskey.com

Tel: +44 1759 302104 Mob: +44 7747 568562

Exploring the Dynamics of Attachment in Adult Life™ – Course Now Full

This is a 3 day course for professionals offering an opportunity to explore one’s own experience of attachment dynamics in the context of a confidential closed experiential group. The work will be supported by didactic input and time for reflection, application and analysis.

Dr Una McCluskey. Psychoanalytic and Systemic Psychotherapist (UKCP)

Part time Senior Research Fellow at the University of York and freelance Attachment Consultant. Author of To be Met as a Person: the Dynamics of Attachment in Professional Encounters. Karnac London, co-author of The Psychodynamics of abuse: the cost of fear, Jessica Kingsley, and joint author with Dr Dorothy Heard and Dr Brian Lake of Attachment Therapy with Adolescents and Adults: theory and practice post Bowlby 2009.

Presented with the Award for Vision, Innovation, Dedication and Achievement (VIDA) in 2004 by the Group Psychotherapy Association of Southern California in appreciation of her contribution to the field of psychotherapy.

COURSE CONTENT

This course seeks to address the fact that as we work in jobs that require us to respond to the needs of others, too often we don’t create the conditions to support our own personal and psychological development.

Experiences of careseeking and caregiving have their roots in infancy and shape our expectations and responses to careseeking and caregiving in adult life.

As professionals offering a service in the field of mental health and social care we will be aware of the many different ways that people express their careseeking needs, and how difficult it is sometimes to interpret these accurately and respond. People who have had contradictory experiences of caregiving will often tend to miscue professional caregivers so that any attempt at caregiving is frustrated and can end up as a frustrating experience for both parties.

The dynamics of attachment consist of several goal-corrected systems. These are careseeking, caregiving, sexuality, exploratory interest sharing with peers, the personal system for self defence, the internal supportive or unsupportive environments and the personally created external supportive environment (home/lifestyle). The theory suggests that these systems work together as a single process to contribute to and maintain maximum wellbeing. Each session will have a short didactic input on the attachment system to be explored that day, followed by two experiential groups with a short break in between. There will be time to identify what people are learning, discovering or applying to their own practice. Una McCluskey has been researching attachment dynamics for many years and will seek permission from the group to continue this work.

Thursday 23rd June 2016

Friday 24th June 2016

Saturday 25th June 2016

FEE: £480 for Bowlby Centre members and £525 for non-members

To be held at The Bowlby Centre, 1 Highbury Crescent, London, N5 1RN

40 Hour course on Attachment Narrative Therapy – COURSE FULL

Presented by: Prof. Rudi Dallo and Prof. Arlene Vetere

Attachment Narrative Therapy: Working Systemically with Attachment Narratives

This course will provide training in the implementation of an integrative therapeutic approach

(ANT) which combines attachment, narrative and systemic theories and techniques. This

combines a consideration of the systemic processes encapsulating problems in families with

an analysis of how these are fuelled by underlying attachment dynamics. In turn this is

explored in terms of how family members’ narratives – explanations and understanding of

their problems – are connected to and in turn shape the attachment and systemic patterns.

The training utilises a range of therapeutic interventions – ‘Formats for Exploration’ which can

be employed in various clinical contexts.

The training programme will provide clinical examples in terms of case studies to illustrate the

approach, DVD material, experiential learning activities and group discussion. The training

programme will cover applications in child, adult and couples settings with illustrations of

work with a wide range of clinical presentations including conduct problems, eating disorders,

self-harm, addictions, domestic violence and trauma. The programme will be in four two-day

blocks of training with a focus on: Integrative Framework and Creating Safety; Exploration

and Formulation; Looking for Alternatives; Complexity, Trauma and Maintaining Change.

Participants will have the opportunity to work in small supervised groups on their own clinical

case material in each of the 4 blocks.

COURSE CONTENT

The Course will cover the following main themes: representational systems of attachment;

intergenerational learning and care in families; trauma and the restriction of attempted

solutions; recursive processes of intervention – paying attention to pattern and process; the

use of self in therapeutic work; developing and monitoring the secure base in therapy and in

families; the use of action techniques in therapy; and healing in relationships.

Block 1 – 22-23 January, 2016

Introduction and Implications of Attachment

Formats for Exploration

Block 2 – 26-27 February, 2016

Attachment Narratives

Formats for Exploration

Block 3 – 18-19 March 2016

Working Therapeutically with Couples

Formats for Exploration

Block 4 – 15-16 April 2016

Working Therapeutically with Trauma and Loss

Formats for Exploration

The Course consists of 4 teaching blocks on Attachment Narrative Therapy.

The 4 blocks will take place at the end of January and February, and March and April, 2016.

Each block starts on a Friday, from 3pm – 8.30pm and finishes on the next day, Saturday,

from 9.30 am to 2pm.

Rudi Dallos

r.dallos@plymouth.ac.uk

Arlene Vetere

drarlenevetere@hotmail.com

Date: 22-23 January, 26-27 February, 2016, 18-19 March, 15-16 April 2016

Cost:£650,  (£500 for Bowlby Centre members ,limited to 5 places) – SOLD OUT

Attachment Repair & Creativity – Course now FULL

SOLD OUT

With Mary Sue Moore

Mary Sue’s presentation will bring together some new information about how the brain learns about, and creates, a knowledge of self and self in relation to another. This happens in large part by ordinary brain responses to relationships built on shared experience. What’s really new in the ideas is that cognitive learning is greatly advanced, when the relationship fosters curiosity, but not authority. Certain kinds of cells (“Glia”-Astrocytes, in particular) that have been thought to be essentially “filler material” found in some key areas of the brain, are actually as important to learning and problem solving than neurons are. It turns out that these “white matter, glial” cells actually potentiate learning as well as neuron growth, and are best activated when both creative activities and interaction with nature are experienced by the child or adult. In addition, as these parts of the brain are nurtured, there is increased ability in the individual to deal with interpersonal and attachment relationship stress. There are many ways to activate these “glial cells” in children and adults — and to foster the growth of a sense of self as competent to meet and surmount challenges in life, despite the experience of early adversity. Clinical/psychotherapeutic and interpersonal applications of this new knowledge of how we learn who we are, and how best to deal with stressful situations, will be a key focus. The presentation will also include discussion of various forms of self-expression and autobiographic narratives as avenues to access and develop the experience of one’s resiliency in adversity.

Date: Saturday 21st November 2015
Time: 10.00am to 4.30pm
Cost:£140 Organisations, £120 Individuals,  (£100 for Bowlby Centre members)

Mary Sue Moore, Ph.D.

Mary Sue is a clinical psychologist, psychotherapist and educator in Colorado. She has taught and participated in a variety of clinical research projects in the U.S., U.K., and Australia over the past 25 years. Her research has focused on attachment theory and the impact of trauma on the developing brain. From 1986 to 1988, Mary Sue undertook a Fulbright Research Fellowship in London, where she worked with John Bowlby at the Tavistock Clinic.

SOLD OUT

 

Saturday 21st Nov. 2015

10.00am to 4.30pm

Cost:£140 Organisations, £120 Individuals, (£100 for Bowlby Centre members)

 

Attachment Repair & Creativity With Mary Sue Moore – pdf brochure