Call Us Today! Tel: 020 7700 5070|admin@thebowlbycentre.org.uk

Assessment

The Centre’s Processes for Assessment

The Bowlby Centre seeks to ensure that every student progresses successfully through the training and eventually registers as an Attachment-based Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist. We take care at the point of entry to the training to approve individuals whom in our judgement have good prospects of registering and endeavour to support students throughout the training. However, The Centre reserves the right to decide whether or not a student is able to progress to further stages on the training at any time during the Course.  In such circumstances, a student may be asked to defer for a proposed period of time or, in extreme circumstances, to leave the Course.

Responsibility for assessment

The overall responsibility for assessment lies with the Clinical Training Committee. The implementation of the assessment process for an individual student is the responsibility of the Course Tutor, delegated by the CTC. Seminar teachers are responsible for assessing participation in seminars, working together with the Course Tutor.

The student’s Training Therapist is not involved in the assessment process at any stage. However, Training Therapists are asked annually by the CTC to confirm that the Bowlby Centre trainees in therapy with them are attending at least twice a week for therapy.  The student’s course colleagues from their year group are not involved in the assessment process at any stage.

The final PiT and RAPP assessment stages are the culmination of the assessment process up to that point. The continuous processes of self-assessment, assessment by the Course Tutors, Teachers, Supervisors, and the termly and annual reviews, are all vital to the successful completion of the training.

Supervisors are responsible for assessing clinical development. The Supervisor regularly reviews students’ progress with written reviews of students’ clinical work at six monthly intervals. These are passed on to the Course Tutor and the CTC and shared with the student.

On-going assessment

The assessment processes are designed to be a continual monitoring throughout the Course so that strengths can be celebrated and validated and problems are identified and addressed. There are two strands to this ongoing assessment:

Regular Progress Reviews each term at a tutorial with the Course Tutor

The process of termly review at an individual tutorial with your Course Tutor enables The Centre to keep in touch with each student’s progress and development. The review involves the student and Course Tutor in a process of reflection together. The goal of this is to identify areas of strengths and success, and to clarify things that need to be worked on and developed further. Where the Course Tutor considers it necessary, issues of concern will be discussed with the Clinical Training Committee once they’ve been discussed with the student. A student will be informed of the areas of concern and the CTC’s decisions.

As part of this process, the student is required to write a self-assessment. Students will be expected to send their self-assessment to their Course Tutor prior to each individual tutorial. These will form part of the folder submitted as the Application to become a Psychotherapist-in Training (APT Folder), as well as providing a starting point for consideration with your Course Tutor and a joint review of progress.

Questions to consider in writing the termly self-assessment are likely to include.

  • What have I learned? 
  • What have I found helpful and/ or unhelpful?
  • What am I finding difficult?
  • What is my impact on others?
  • How do others impact on me?
  • How am I dealing with diversity and difference?
  • How am I progressing in holding uncertainty?
  • How am I relating to my year group? 
  • How am I finding the reading and relating theory and practice?
  • How am I progressing with written work? 
  • Where am I in relation to fulfilling the Criteria for becoming a PiT or RAPP?
  • How am I progressing with my APT Folder or Portfolio?
  • Where am I relation to holding The Bowlby Centre Values in relation to working clinically?
  • What are the key areas of development for me during the next term?

This reflection is normally about 1000 words or equivalent.

 

Assessment Procedure to Become a Psychotherapist-in-Training

Introduction

The first two years of the Course are a preparation for becoming a Psychotherapist-in-Training. The aim is for each student to be ready to take this step by the end of the Second Year. An important consideration is each student’s own sense of readiness. This is reviewed in tutorials, which will include a thorough exploration of ways in which the student does or does not feel ready. It is also very important that students discuss their sense of readiness with their Training Therapist.

In the third term of the second year there will be an assessment of readiness to proceed. While it is the aim to support students to be ready to become Psychotherapists-in-Training at the end of the second year we recognise that this will not always be possible. We also recognise that the difficulties that arise and the best response will vary. If a student is not ready to proceed at this point, either because of their own assessment or that of the CTC, there will be opportunity for discussion about the best way forward with your Course Tutor.

The CTC will agree each student’s readiness to move into the clinical part of the training (ratify them as a PiT) following consideration of:

  • Reports from two Assessors of the review with the student of the student’s APT folder
  • Report from three pre-clinical supervision sessions
  • Report from the Course Tutor (following meetings with teachers and with the student).
  • Confirmation from the Treasurer that the student is up to date with fees and not in financial debt to CAPP.

The CTC’s decision will be discussed with the students in Summer Term of the second year (Term 6) or prior to their return to year three of the course.  If the student disagrees with the decision of the CTC, they can trigger the Appeal Procedure.

Criteria for becoming a Psychotherapist in Training

To become a Psychotherapist-in-Training the Bowlby Centre has to be satisfied that each student is safe to practise as an Attachment-based Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist on the basis that the practice will be regularly supervised. The Supervisor will agree referrals accepted, and the student will continue to be in a learning environment [I don’t know what that sentence means – suggest something instead like “The Supervisor will discuss all referrals with the student in advance of beginning work with individual clients”.].

This requires the development of personal qualities as well as theoretical study. An overall assessment will be made of each student’s readiness to start clinical work. The factors that will be taken into account in making this assessment are:

  • Acceptance and understanding in practice of the Bowlby Centre’s values of attachment and inclusion and Code of Ethics and Practice
  • A developing understanding of the principles of Attachment-based Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy and their application in practice
  • A capacity for self-reflection and for emotional honesty
  • A well developed emotional awareness of your response to others and impacts upon others, together with a capacity to bear conflict including evidence from your reflections on your experience in the training year
  • A capacity to be in touch with your own and others’ emotional life and a capacity to verbalise that insight including evidence from recent work with people in emotional distress
  • An awareness of the effects of your own and others prejudice in relation to, for example, disability, gender, sexuality and sexual orientation, class, and race and its implication to clinical work and relationships with colleagues
  • An understanding of psychoanalytic thought on the nature of unconscious process. An ability to relate previous experience or reading about therapeutic approaches to attachment-based psychoanalytic psychotherapy
  • A sense of the place that will be found in your life for working clinically as a Psychotherapist-in-Training
  • The student must be up to date with their fees when applying for PiT. NB the Course Tutor must have, at the relevant CTC, written confirmation of the student not owing money

Application to become a Psychotherapist-in-Training folder (APT folder)

  1. Each student prepares a folder as their application to become a Psychotherapist-in-Training and be approved to commence Bowlby Centre clinical work under supervision.
  2. The purpose of the folder and a discussion of it with two assessors is to demonstrate readiness to begin clinical work by meeting the criteria above. The folder must be agreed with the Course Tutor before it can be presented for assessment.

The APT Folder will include:

  • Self-assessments for Year 1 and Year 2 to Term 5 (Spring Term year 2). These are reflections on your Bowlby Centre training and its impact on your personal development and are prepared termly, normally for your individual tutorial, and discussed with your Course Tutor. These are not expected to be more than 1000 words in length and may include other media like photographs, poetry, paintings etc. Your self-assessments will reflect upon your own sense of emotional readiness to work clinically.
  • A reflection on your development and learning (between 5000 and 10,000 words or equivalent). This is normally in the form of an exploration of the experiences that have led you to wish to apply to become a PiT. It will usually include reflections on your past life experience, experience of learning and study, and experience of work. It is helpful if you link this to the values about yourself and others that will inform your work as a clinician. These reflections are seen as “work in progress” in your journey towards becoming a psychotherapist.
  • An example of some work you have done as part of the course which demonstrates how you are integrating the theory of the training with your own experience and development.
  • A short reflection on what you are learning from your infant observation which will help you in your future clinical work (normally not more than 1000 words).

Written work for your APT Folder needs to be typed. Any references quoted should use the standard referencing system used by the Attachment Journal.

e.g. Bowlby, J. (1988) A Secure Base; Clinical Applications of Attachment Theory (pp.33-35) London: Tavistock/Routledge

  1. Preparing your reflection paper will involve:
  • Assessing your strengths and areas that you need to develop.
  • Identifying gaps and conflicts in your understanding and considering ways to address them.
  • Considering your development in relation to readiness to work as a psychotherapist.
  • Exploring the range of ways you want to use psychotherapeutic skills and different elements of the training in your personal and professional life, one-to-one, and in groups or organisations.
  • Demonstrating how you wish to represent your development in your Folder or Portfolio. This is primarily done through written work. It is important that you make a record of your seminar contributions even where, at the time, they are not delivered in the form of a paper.
  • Checking that what you want to do relates to Bowlby Centre’s criteria for becoming a Psychotherapist-in-Training.
  • Using your group of peers to talk through ideas and plans.

Pre-interview procedures – preparation of APT folder

The first stage starts at the beginning of Autumn Term of second year (Term 4.) as you begin assembling your APT folder. In conjunction with your Course Tutor continue preparing your self-assessments and begin preparing your written reflection paper and developing your Application for Psychotherapist-in-Training (APT) Folder,

In the Spring Term of the Second Year (Term 5) you continue to work towards completion of your APT Folder. Your Course Tutor will give you the date by which your APT folder has to be with your chosen Assessors. Your folder must first be approved to go forward by your Course Tutor.

The next stage continues during the first half of the Spring Term when you meet with your Course Tutor to discuss the choice of Clinical Supervisor. This person will normally be your first Training Supervisor. You may not approach any one to discuss being a Training Supervisor until you have the agreement of your Course Tutor.

 

 

Becoming a Registered Attachment-based Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist (RAPP)

Criteria for Registration

In order to register as a registered member and be a registered member of the United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy, The Bowlby Centre has to be satisfied that a person is safe to practise as an Attachment-based Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist (RAPP) taking responsibility for their own professional management and continuing professional development.

The Criteria set out for progression to Psychotherapist-in-Training (PiT) continue to apply and must have been upheld during the training period. These are:

  • Acceptance and understanding in practice of The Bowlby Centre values of attachment and inclusion and the Code of Ethics and Practice
  • A developing understanding of the principles of Attachment-based Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy and their application in practice
  • A capacity for self-reflection and for emotional honesty
  • A well developed emotional awareness of your response to others and impact on others, together with a capacity to bear conflict including evidence from your reflections on your experience in the training year
  • A capacity to be in touch with your own and others’ emotional life and a capacity to verbalise that insight including evidence from recent work with people in emotional distress
  • An awareness of the effects of your own and others prejudice in relation to, for example, disability, gender, sexuality and sexual orientation, class, and race and its implication for clinical work and relationships with colleagues
  • An understanding of psychoanalytic thought on the nature of unconscious process
  • An ability to relate previous experience or reading about therapeutic approaches to attachment-based psychoanalytic psychotherapy
  • A sense of the place that will be found in your life for working clinically as a Psychotherapist-in-Training

An overall assessment will be made of a person’s readiness to Register. The factors in addition to the above Criteria that will be taken into account in making this assessment are:

  • Acceptance and understanding in practice of The Bowlby Centre Values of attachment and inclusion and Code of Ethics and Practice
  • A clear understanding of the principles of Attachment-based Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy and their application in clinical practice
  • An essentially compassionate attitude, together with a balanced approach to conflict
  • An understanding of unconscious communication and working with the transference and counter transference
  • An ability to work successfully as an Attachment-based Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist
  • A wide range of critical reading and theoretical understanding of attachment theory and psychoanalysis from both an historical and a contemporary point of view
  • A sense of the place of working as a psychotherapist in your life and of the ways in which you can maintain secure clinical practice and ongoing development
  • An awareness of the field of psychotherapy and the contribution you make to it
  • The student must have fully paid up any money owing to The Bowlby Centre when applying for registration. NB the Course Tutor must have, at the relevant CTC, written confirmation of the student not owing money

Once you have completed the taught course and your clinical work with your training client and others you may apply to register as a member of The Bowlby Centre and the UKCP.

The Registration Portfolio will include:

  • An in depth, written account of the process of working with one client for two years at least twice a week relating this to a theoretical framework. The clinical paper will be approximately 8,000-12,000 words
  • Evidence of your work with other clients to demonstrate the breadth of your work. Students are normally required to work with 6 other clients for a minimum of 6 mths each, one of whom should be of 18 mths duration at least once a week
  • An Infant Observation paper describing the observation of an infant from very early life to 18 months. This paper will be approximately 8,000-12,000 words
  • Papers based on presentations given or discussions lead in Course Seminars
  • Written final reports from two Training Supervisors
  • The reflections paper from the APT Folder with additional updated material to bring the reflection up to date
  • A written reflection on developments in the student’s clinical practice while being a Psychotherapist in Training
  • An account of what the person have gained from supervision and the arrangements made for continuing supervision once Registered
  • A personal account of how your life has developed as a result of therapy and being a Psychotherapist-in-Training
  • Discussion of your future plans for continuing professional development

Other elements which may be included (in consultation with your Tutor):

  • a paper written on an area of research which interests you
  • reviews of books you have read
  • an account of the application of attachment-based psychoanalytic principles to your non-clinical work – for example as a teacher
  • reflections on study days, lectures, seminars, and workshops you have attended

For the Registration Portfolio you are encouraged to use your creativity to develop, explore or research other topics relevant to the practice of attachment-based psychoanalytic psychotherapy. You may include in your final Portfolio, alongside the written work set out above, other writings (e.g. diaries, professional articles etc.), photographs, video, paintings, or drawings.

Written work for your Registration Portfolio needs to be typed. Any references quoted should use the standard referencing system used by the Attachment Journal e.g. Bowlby, J. (1988) A Secure Base; Clinical Applications of Attachment Theory (pp.33-35) London: Tavistock/Routledge

Procedure For Applying To Become A Registered Attachment-Based Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist (RAPP)

Pre-interview Procedure

To apply for Registration a completed Portfolio must be submitted to your Course Tutor for approval, accompanied by the final two Supervisors’ reports.

With their Course Tutor each student should discuss their Supervisors’ final reports, their clinical paper, and the rest of their Portfolio. The Course Tutor must agree that you are ready to proceed to Registration Interviews. The response to the Criteria for becoming a Registered Attachment-based Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist should be contained in the Portfolio. The discussion at the interviews will be based on the content of your Portfolio, both your written account of clinical work and the other material included in the Portfolio.

Your Course Tutor will check with the Treasurer that you have no outstanding debts to The Bowlby Centre. You may not proceed to registration until all debts to The Bowlby Centre are paid. You must also have sent a copy of your current certificate of Professional Liability Insurance with TBC office. Your Course Tutor will check that this is in order.

In consultation with your Course Tutor you agree two assessors for your RAPP Portfolio. These are chosen from the Interviewer list, one from Group A, (the CTC of The Bowlby Centre) and one from Group B, (senior, experienced Bowlby Centre Members.) The assessors cannot include your past or present Training Therapist, Course Tutor, or Training Supervisor/s.

Arranging the Interviews

In consultation with your Course Tutor you agree two interviewers. These must be chosen from the Interview Panel, which consists of Group A and Group B. The interviewers cannot include your Therapist, Course Tutor, or your Training Supervisor/s. Your Course Tutor informs the Clinical Training Committee of your application. With the agreement of the Course Tutor the student will arrange a date, time and place to meet with each interviewer and will undertake to send the Portfolio to them two weeks prior to the interviews.

Post-interview Procedure

Following the two interviews, (normally each of one hour) the two interviewers and the Course Tutor evaluate the application for Registration and make a recommendation to the Clinical Training Committee (CTC). The CTC makes the ratification decision and informs the student in writing.

The authority to ratify the application rests with the CTC. The interviewers do not normally discuss their recommendations with you after the interview, but evaluate the entire application with the Course Tutor.

If the decision is to recommend Registration:

  • The Course Tutor informs the CTC of the recommendation
  • The CTC discuss and ratify the recommendation
  • The Chair of the CTC writes confirming their decision and a copy of the letter is sent to TBC Administrator
  • The Bowlby Centre Administrator will invoice you for the Interview Fee and notify the UKCP of your Registration

If the decision is not to recommend Registration:

  • The interviewers and Course Tutor prepare a letter to the CTC with detailed reasons for their decision, including proposals for the next step
  • The Chair of the CTC writes to you setting out the decision of the CTC, including reasons and proposals
  • The Bowlby Centre Administrator will invoice you for the Interview Fee

 

PROCEDURE FOR STUDENTS DEFERRING THEIR CLINICAL TRAINING

March 2012

The taught part of the course is designed to be followed through year by year over four years. In the event that a student wishes to defer their place on the training for personal reasons, the student needs to make a written request to the CTC in consultation with the course tutor. If agreed, a deferral will be granted for the duration of one academic year and can be reviewed if the student wishes to defer for a subsequent year. Deferrals are not automatically rolled over from year to year and students will be asked to make a written request to the CTC, with reasons for a further deferral. Normally no more than two consecutive deferrals will be granted. If at all possible it is better to defer at the end of an academic year as deferrals that are taken mid year will normally necessitate a repeat of the whole academic year. Upon returning to the training, the student’s fees will be charged at the same rate as the Intake that is being joined, and not at the rate at which the student originally joined. This will therefore result in a rise in fees.

Procedure:

The first step is to raise any concerns with your course tutor so that you can talk through the issues that have arisen for you. Should you wish to make the decision to defer, this needs to be put in writing to the chair of the CTC with a full explanation of why you have decided to defer.

Requirements:

Normally you would be required to stay in therapy on a weekly basis and to meet with your course tutor for termly individual tutorials. You would also be expected to attend three clinical forums at the centre during the year of your deferral.

There is a reduced rate of annual fees for deferred students which would need to be paid, and all outstanding debts would need to have been settled before returning to the training.

For students wishing to defer at the end of the first year, the infant observation must be terminated and a new infant found on return to the training. This infant can be a few months old (rather than a newborn) if the first observation was some way in.

For students wishing to defer at the end of the second year, the application to become a Psychotherapist in Training (PiT) will be suspended so that you go through your PiT interviews with your new Intake (but with the support of your existing course tutor.) If for any reason the decision to defer is made after the PiT process has been completed, then you will need to do a modified PiT process which involves a reflections paper and a further interview with a member from the CTC prior to returning to the training.

For students wishing to defer at the end of the third or fourth year, a decision needs to be made about whether or not to suspend clinical work. This must be done in consultation with your course tutor, training supervisor and the CTC. For those trainees who have been approved by the CTC to continue with clinical work, it is a requirement that you stay in twice weekly therapy and that you inform your training supervisor of your deferral.

The CTC would receive regular reports from the training supervisor. For those trainees who are suspending clinical work, discussions on how to end with clients must be carried out with your training supervisor and course tutor. The CTC may be involved where necessary.

 

For students wishing to defer after the taught part of the course but before registering, all of the above applies.

In all cases of deferrals during the taught part of the training the student will stay with their existing course tutor until the training is resumed, but on return to the training the student will move to the course tutor of the year group the student is joining. This transition would normally take place over the summer so that you can have an appropriate ending with your current course tutor at the end of the academic year and an initial meeting with your new course tutor prior to returning in September/October of the following year.

 

 

PROCEDURE FOR STUDENTS ASKED TO DEFER THEIR CLINICAL TRAINING OR TO LEAVE THE COURSE

 

In the event that a student is asked to defer their place on the training on the basis of a CTC decision, a deferral may be requested for the duration of at least one academic year.  In extreme circumstances, the CTC may decide to ask students to leave the course.  In either case, if a student disagrees with the decision of the CTC, they can trigger the Appeals Procedure.

Normally no more than two consecutive deferrals will be granted.  If at the end of this period the CTC decides not to allow the student to return to the training, the student will be asked to leave the course.  This decision will be final and is not appealable.

Where possible, the CTC will ask a student to defer at the end of an academic year as deferrals that are taken mid year will normally necessitate a repeat of the whole academic year.

The criteria set out for progression to Psychotherapist-in-Training (PiT) and registration outlined elsewhere in the assessment policy will be the basis for any decision by the CTC to ask a student to defer or leave the course.  Evidence will be obtained by the CTC using only the procedures outlined in the assessment policy.  The Criteria will continue to apply and must have been upheld during any deferral period.

The CTC may also choose to defer a student on the grounds of concern about their emotional ability to cope with the demands of the training. If this is the case the CTC will outline clearly the evidence for their concern which may or may not be set solely against the criteria contained in PiT and RAPP.

If the CTC decides to ask a student to defer or leave the course, they will write to the student within 28 days of the CTC meeting where the decision was made, outlining under which elements of the assessment policy the decision was made, and which evidence was used in coming to that decision.  The student has the right to see any evidence used by the CTC in reaching its decision, upon request.  If the CTC decides to ask a student to defer or leave the course during an academic year, they will include in their decision letter their reasoning.

Upon returning to the training, the student’s fees will be charged at the same rate as the Intake that is being joined, and not at the rate at which the student originally joined.

 

 

 

Appeal

There is an Appeals Procedure that is available for students to challenge decisions made by the CTC during the assessment process. The responsibility for judgements on each student’s progress, continuation on the Course, the achievement of Psychotherapist-in-Training status and Registration lies with the CTC and is substantially delegated to the Course Tutor.

An appeal will be considered on any of the following grounds:

  • The decision was made against the weight of evidence
  • The sanction was disproportionate
  • There was a procedural impropriety that goes against this policy
  • There is fresh evidence which was not available at the time of the CTC hearing and decision.

Any appeal must be in writing, specify which grounds it is submitted under and be accompanied by any supporting documentation and submitted to the CTC within 14 days of notification of the decision and/or sanction by the CTC.

The appeal will be heard by someone independent from, and appointed by, the CTC.  The student will be told the name of this individual in writing by the CTC.  The student will have 7 days to request a different individual to hear the appeal but the student will be able to do this only once.

The individual nominated to consider the appeal will review any submissions from the student and from the CTC in line with the policy as outlined above.

The individual hearing the appeal will report their decision to the CTC and the student in writing within 14 days, outlining the reason for their decision in line with the specific wording in this policy.

The person hearing the appeal has the option only of upholding or overturning the original CTC decision.  They can recommend alternative sanctions but they cannot be enforced without the agreement of the CTC and the individual concerned.  If the proposed timescale is unachievable, the individual hearing the appeal will write to the CTC and the individual appealing to explain the reasoning and give a new timescale.

This decision will be final and has no right of appeal.